Ability and Community

iHuman: Support Through Art

I was once questioned if I would prefer art or fame. My reply was ART. Art is something you can hold, cherish, and have forever. Did you know art can also be educational, rehabilitating, life changing, and therapeutic? I’m not referring to studying at a college or university but by a very significant program we have in the community that is literally saving and changing the lives of young people.

iHuman is all about creating workable pathways for Edmonton youth to live healthy lives. Through these pathways, iHuman has a dedicated caring staff to work with youth to establish a support system that covers their basic needs (this includes safe shelter, food, mental and physical health care, and life skills training). Many youth also need addiction counseling and foster-home placement. iHuman uses its available resources to support these young people as much as it can, helping guide and form the life paths of at-risk youth.

Now at a new location at 10231 95 Street, some of the amazing programs offered are Art and Design, Fashion, Music, Dance, and Drama. These courses can be very therapeutic and rehabilitating for youth to express their feelings and share with a safe group. They arrive from all sorts of situations and this is a great resource where they can express and learn.

iHuman partners with university-based researchers and strategically positioned community-based workers, giving these vulnerable youth an amazing chance of developing a talent and changing a life pattern through expression.

The program never gives up on anyone and provides mentorship as well. They are welcoming and open to all youth between 12 and 24 irrespective of culture, race, gender, or background. They have beautified the community in more ways than one, providing wonderful expressions of art and providing and sharing with everyone.

To me, iHuman exemplifies the true meaning of art: sharing, expressing, rehabilitating, and supporting. Some of the art that has come out of this amazing network is reminiscent of the next Jackson Pollack or the creativity of Salvador Dali!

iHuman can be reached at (780) 421-8811 for more information on their programs and support!

Ian is a resident of Boyle Street, a member of the Advisory Board for Services for Persons with Disabilities for the City of Edmonton, and the recipient of the Glenrose Award of Courage.

More in this issue

Neighbourhood Views

  • Oilers Legend at the Rink – Former Edmonton Oilers star Marty McSorley played shinny hockey with the children at the McCauley Rink on February 15 as part of an after school skating program run by E4C, the City of Edmonton, McCauley Community League, and the Oilers Alumni Association. Dan Glugosh

  • Zero Carbon Homes for McCauley – From left: Godo Stoyke, Anna Bubel, Shanthu Mano, and Martin Garber-Conrad (not pictured) hope to build zero carbon homes in McCauley. They purchased this property at 9329 109 Avenue to be the very first. It will be torn down and rebuilt. Paula E. Kirman

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