Boyle McCauley News

Since 1979 • February-March 2022 • Circulation 5000

Light Up McCauley! A New Neighbourhood Project

Improved lighting can benefit a neighbourhood’s safety and beauty.

An aerial photo of the McCauley Rink beautifully illuminated with new Edison bulbs. Leif Gregersen

Crime prevention studies have shown that poor lighting creates an environment that attracts property crimes like vandalism and theft. They have also shown that darkness can make people feel insecure and prevent them from using public spaces. And when people aren’t out enjoying their neighbourhoods, crime can increase again.

In addition to preventing crime, improved lighting can benefit neighbourhoods in other ways. It can be beautiful. It can lift people’s spirits. It can identify and highlight an important neighbourhood space. And it can improve neighbourhood cohesion and pride. One great example in McCauley are the trees in Giovanni Caboto Park, brightly lit in the colours of Italy’s flag.

Motivated by the many benefits of improved lighting, Safer McCauley and the McCauley Community League have partnered to launch a neighbourhood-wide lighting campaign called “Light Up McCauley.” The first evidence of this campaign is the beautiful string of Edison bulbs surrounding the McCauley Rink.

“Light Up McCauley” is not a one-time project. Instead, the campaign, supported by funding from City of Edmonton McCauley Revitalization, will carry on indefinitely through a series of projects. 300 units of solar-powered, motion-activated lighting are currently being provided free of charge to businesses in the Chinatown Business Improvement Area, with the Chinatown Transformation Collaborative Society giving support with installation.

Other projects in the campaign include the distribution of decorative lights and motion-activated lights free of charge to McCauley residents, support for neighbour-driven alley lighting parties, and additional lighting in Giovanni Caboto Park.

Stay tuned to @SaferMcCauley and @McCauleyCommunityLeague on Facebook for more information about the “Light Up McCauley” campaign.

_Mark is the Program Manager for REACH Edmonton’s Neighbourhood Organizing Initiative.
Alice is the President of the McCauley Community League Board._

To David Littlefeather, With Love and Thanks

A tribute to a beloved McCauley community member.

David Littlefeather. File Photo

Hi David, it’s me, Kathryn. I was just sitting at a table in Spinelli’s, your favourite place for an “American-cano” as you called it. The staff members there have been asking after you, and were very sad to hear of your sudden passing in early December. I remember the last time I saw you there: it was a sunny winter day, and you were sitting outside on the bench, as you liked to do. You were so excited to see me that you pointed me out to the fellow sitting next to you, and I felt like a celebrity! Thank you for making me feel so valued, so important.

Your enthusiasm for certain things was contagious. You loved to share what you bought on your monthly payday trips to Walmart: your new sweatpants or sneakers, or the Christmas presents that you saved up for over the course of the year and would place under your tree months in advance.

I know there are many people who could tell me more about other things that you loved, but here are some of the things I know: you loved your early morning coffee at Spinelli’s; you loved shopping at Walmart on paydays; you loved Pepsi (and would deliver a bottle to your neighbours Brenda and Umayaz whenever you could), you loved watching I Love Lucy and The Flintstones on your DVD player, you loved attending Sacred Heart Church, you loved getting a free t-shirt and other cool stuff when you volunteered at events; you loved walking your two block circuit between McCauley Apartments, the Italian Centre, and Spinelli’s, the corner bench by Sacred Heart Church, and sometimes as far as Stadium Mini Mart.

You loved watching the world go by, seeing the people who knew you, going to visit the people who knew you, door-to-door, until sometimes it made some of us annoyed! You loved the Heart of the City Music Festival, and the McCauley Clean Up, and Boyle McCauley News, and other activities that happened in your neighbourhood.

I first knew you as David Grant. Long ago, you would hang out at Bissell Centre, my first job in the inner city. When I started at McCauley Apartments, there you were! It was a joyful reunion, and even though it was your birthday – November 1st – you went to Zocalo and bought me a little plant as a welcome gift. You had changed your name to David Littlefeather. As you told the story to me: you were at a gathering and an Elder saw you, pointed right at you, and said, “You! Your name is Little Feather,” and then you went about the process of changing your name, of claiming that name as your own.

I miss you David. Sometimes it was hard, and you would do something that was grumpy or inappropriate or annoying, and we would have a little conflict, and you would snap at me. After 10 minutes or so, you would return and say “I’m sorry,” and you’d giggle, and I’d giggle back, and all would be well again. This time of COVID was really hard for you. You lost many things. You lost your hangouts, especially the McCauley office, and then Sacred Heart had a fire and you couldn’t go there, and then Spinelli’s was closed for a long time. You even lost your dog – what a painful time that was. Changes were very hard for you. It was hard to say goodbye, and you grieved every little loss, getting tearful whenever someone left or something changed.

It breaks my heart that you died alone, David. I wish that we could have accompanied you on your final journey. I want you to know that you are so missed, that you were loved. You were such a familiar face around these two or so blocks of Little Italy, that everyone there notices your absence. I want you to know that we will not forget you, that your life was not in vain, and that you were an essential part of our community.

We are going to dedicate the bench at the back of McCauley Apartments to you, David. It will be known as “David’s bench.” Whenever someone sits there, they will see your name and remember you, or ask about you, and all of us who knew you will remember and tell them about David Littlefeather, our neighbourhood friend.

It is my honour to share something about you here. There are so many others who knew you, who knew other parts of your story. We will not forget. We will share your story. Your family was not a key part of your life, and they have not been there for you in your death. I want you to know that even if your family doesn’t come to claim you, we claim you. We will pray over you, and for you. We will remember you and honour you.

Thank you David, for sharing your life with us. For being our friend, our neighbour, our observer, our enthusiast, our town crier, our colourful grump, our beloved little feather. Peace be with you.

Kathryn is the Manager of Community Development, Housing & Mental Health Division, with e4c.

Boyle Street Community Services is Moving

BSCS will be moving into this building at 10010 107A Avenue after it is renovated. Leif Gregersen

Boyle Street Community Services (BSCS) has announced plans to move to 10010 107A Avenue, two blocks north of its current location at 10116 105 Street, where it has been since 1996. A newly-renovated building at this site is scheduled to open in the summer or fall of 2023.

“We are very excited about this,” says Jordan Reiniger, Executive Director of BSCS. “Today we are signalling to our city that we need to do better for the most vulnerable in our community. This new purpose-built facility will allow us to achieve improved outcomes for those we serve and be a significant improvement in terms of our interactions with and impact on the surrounding community.”

Design work is still underway, and is being informed by Indigenous culture. BSCS is planning engagement with surrounding businesses, community groups, and residents. Construction is expected to begin in 2022.

The new site was originally built in 1960 as the administration offices for Edmonton Public Schools and was an example of the Brutalist style of architecture, with concrete construction and hard angles. After the school board moved to its current location on Kingsway, the building was used by community organizations including the Edmonton Mennonite Centre for Newcomers (EMCN), Changing Together, Right at Home Housing Society, and the Edmonton Social Planning Council. Most recently, the building was used as an indoor paintball centre.

The parcel of land also includes an apartment building north of the main building. Trinity Manor used to offer supported housing for refugees living with trauma as part of a service developed by the EMCN. When federal funding for the program was discontinued, it became below-market rentals. BSCS will continue to operate the 38-suite apartment, first taking over as landlord for current tenants, then renovating suites and converting them to affordable housing as suites become available.

The move across 101st Street will place BSCS officially within the McCauley neighbourhood. Currently, the organization is situated in Central McDougall.

“The McCauley Community League board has heard a range of perspectives from neighbours on this topic,” says Alice Kos, President of the MCL. “What we’d like to see – and support –  are meaningful, ongoing community engagements and consultations between BSCS, the City, and community members. All community stakeholders deserve to voice their perspectives; it’s essential that mechanisms are put in place to address concerns.”

Anita Jenkins is a retired writer and editor who lives in Boyle Street.

Love Villanelle*

very rarely is love and understanding not enough
still it is easy to hurt the ones we care about the most
you need to be loving and sincere but also tough

being liked and having friends does not mean much
or that when you party you can act the perfect host
very rarely is love and understanding not enough

giving those we love their freedom is always rough
we care so much but they may not feel as close
you need to be loving and sincere but also tough

it doesn’t matter if we have the coolest stuff
a gold necklace is not better than a single rose
very rarely is love and understanding not enough

don’t hide your inner feelings show your love
your lover needs the words even if they know
you need to be loving and sincere but also tough

they say relationships are heaven’s gift to us
this is clear when we find ourselves alone
very rarely is love and understanding not enough
you need to be loving and sincere but also tough

Leif lives in McCauley. You can visit his website at  www.edmontonwriter.com

*A villanelle is a 19-line poem with two rhymes, five tercets (three lines of poetry forming a stanza), (four lines forming a stanza). The first and third lines of the opening tercet recur alternately at the end of the other tercets and both are repeated at the close of the concluding quatrain.

Thank a Mail Carrier

“Neither rain, nor snow, nor death of the night, can keep us from our duty.” (Pony Express Motto, ca. 1860)

“Through rain or snow, or sleet or hail, we’ll carry the mail. We will not fail.” (Informal motto of the United States Postal Service.)

We have observed a number of holidays in the past few months. If you are one of many worldwide who send out seasonal cards, we have postal workers who do their best to deliver.

February 4th is actually one of those little-known observances: Thank A Mail Carrier Day! There won’t be a parade or a day off, but to observe we can always thank a postal worker by putting up a little “thank you” sign on our mailboxes. If you are in a post office and see a postal worker, be sure to say, “thank you!”

Let’s turn this into a big day of thanks. I have a neighbour/friend who is a letter carrier. I observe him walking to work, then walking home after work, after spending the majority of his day walking. That deserves respect.

I am personally very thankful for postal workers, delivery drivers, sales clerks, transit workers, and any workers deemed essential in this pandemic. You deserve recognition and support. Thank you!

Ian is a columnist with the paper. He lives in the area.

Chicken King: Worth Seeking Out

Chicken King Chinese Restaurant
10951 101 Street
780-244-2536
Hours: Sun.-Thu.: 11 a.m.–9 p.m.
Fri.-Sat.: 11 a.m.–10 p.m.
Menu: chickenking2020.com

You might easily miss some of the best Cantonese or Singapore-style Chinese food in McCauley if you only explore the 97th Street area.

While returning from a visit to previously-reviewed Eat-Sushi.ca, we noticed a sign saying “Chicken King” that’s hidden in plain sight across from the Royal Alex Hospital car parkade on the east side of 101 Street. None of us remembered seeing it before, so we gave it a try the next time we craved Chinese food.

While an easy walk from home, Chicken King shares a convenient parking lot with Barcode Karaoke Bar and Lounge. Inside the front door we found plenty of tables for larger groups and families as well as smaller tables.

On sitting down, we asked how long the place had been there, and discovered that they’d been open for just over a year. Right after things started reopening from the beginning wave of COVID, Chicken King launched their new restaurant. Then the next pandemic wave lockdown hit. So, they pivoted to online orders, and bravely kept their dream alive.

Chicken King offers both westernized and authentic Chinese menus, so our big family group was excited to sample from both. While deciding on dishes (there are so many choices!) we saw a steady of stream of takeout orders, and pickups by SkipTheDishes and UberEats, so I looked them up on my phone. Earning a 9.5/10 Skip rating, they must be doing something right.

We started with a classic Hot & Sour soup, which my sister-in-law absolutely loved. It was thick, tangy, and loaded with bamboo shoots, fungus, and tofu – perfect to warm us up. From the Chinese menu, we had poached chicken with scallion sauce. Being poached – just like an egg cooked in water – gives the chicken a whiter skin that doesn’t look as cooked as it really is, while the gentle boiling gives the chicken a softer texture that is delicate and delicious. Most of us loved it.

Lemon chicken from the western menu was made superbly crispy, so the sweet lemon sauce didn’t make it soggy. We were all impressed with the egg fried rice, because the eggs were done perfectly, with some firmness, yet soft and smoky too. Stir fried vegetables with garlic showed off the chef’s skills too – with cauliflower, carrot, broccoli, snow peas, mushrooms, and celery, everything was cooked to be glistening and tender but not at all overdone. My only desire might be to add a little red bell pepper to mix up the colour a bit. But the Curry Beef was even better, with a gentle warmth, and green peppers as a nice counterpoint in colour and crunch – very much a comfort food. Warm happiness! And if spicy is your thing, the Kung Pao Chicken will be your new favourite. Look out for the red chili pepper bits – they’re fresh, piquant, and potent.

Chicken King is another hidden secret on the McCauley food scene that’s worth knowing about. It’s also super-handy when arctic cold makes you feel like ordering in.

_Alan lives in McCauley. He is the Chair of the paper’s Board of Directors. _

Emerging from the “Big Freeze”

Dear friends,

What a winter! I’m writing to you just as our “big freeze” is beginning to lift, and I know that so many of us (myself included!) were discouraged by the longest cold snap we’ve had in over 50 years. I hope that you were all able to stay safe and warm.

This period of cold weather felt extra difficult given the need to stay cautious about our face-to-face contacts as we focused on keeping ourselves and our communities safe. I know that this has put a lot of strain on so many people. I wanted to write to you and let you know, though, how proud I am of the Boyle Street and McCauley communities.

Throughout this cold winter, and over the past couple of years, our communities and the individuals who make them up have shown incredible resilience and willingness to band together and care for each other. Neighbours have done a great job of checking in and offering support with chores and errands. Individuals and grassroots organizations have shown tremendous commitment to advocating for, and with, unhoused community members. We’ve seen real flexibility and creativity from community leagues and other groups as they’ve planned, pivoted, and run events to bring us all together.

Please know that the care that you show for each other is one of my biggest inspirations to continue doing the work that I do. Ultimately, we’re all doing this together. I’ll continue to work hard to fight for my constituents here in Boyle Street and McCauley and throughout Edmonton-Highlands-Norwood. And together, we’ll keep working toward the equitable and just world that we want to live in, and that we know is possible.

I hope that you’re all healthy, safe, and finding joy, connection, and rest wherever possible. While our constituency office remains closed to visitors at this time, we’re available via phone and email, and we’re working hard to stay in touch with all of you. As always, I’m here to help, so if you need anything, would like to share your thoughts or feedback, or if you’d just like to say hello, please reach out!

Take good care of yourselves and each other.

Janis Irwin, MLA for
Edmonton-Highlands-Norwood
Email: Edmonton.HighlandsNorwood@assembly.ab.ca
Phone: 780-414-0682
Twitter / Facebook: JanisIrwin "Instagram":https://www.instagram.com/Janis.Irwin / "TikTok":https://www.tiktok.com/janis.irwin: @Janis.Irwin

Indigenous Fashion Show Highlights Local Designers

Event also featured a community dinner and clothing drive.

Model Sidney Nehua-Jackson on the catwalk in Heather Bouchier Design’s stunning red dress. Curtis Cameron

Heart of the City’s first ever Indigenous fashion show, clothing drive, and community dinner took place on December 12th. The event was held at Parkdale Cromdale Community League and organized by Heart of the City’s board and Heather Bouchier, a local Indigenous fashion designer. The event was a huge success and completely sold out!

The show featured Heather Bouchier Design and Rhonda Johnson of Acahkos design. We were so pleased to have Erin Meetoos of Erin’s Regalia do her first fashion show with us. Indigenous photographer Curtis Cameron took beautiful shots of the show. Jodi Calahoo Stonehouse was our emcee, and we were honoured to have the City of Edmonton’s Indigenous Artist-in-Residence, Creeasian as our DJ.

The music was rocking, the models were stunning in modern Indigenous designs – and then there was the food! We had a lovely meal of venison stew, vegan stew, bannock, and dessert bannock with bananas and blueberry compote provided by Nék̓em, an organization that also distributed the clothing we collected to houseless community members.

We were joined by City Councillor Ashley Salvador as well as Mayor Amarjeet Sohi and his wife. Mayor Sohi spoke about building an inclusive community, an Edmonton for everyone.

We were also entertained by Inuit comic Cindy Rivers who had the audience in stitches.

The show was a huge success and we want to thank all those involved including the models who walked our catwalk with grace and flair.

Check out our website heartcityfest.com for more pictures of the event and upcoming opportunities to volunteer with Heart of the City.

Corine Demas serves as volunteer President and Spoken Word Director of the Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton. Corine is passionate about poetry, storytelling, and her city, Edmonton. She lives in McCauley.

John Aram: “What thrills me is making progress together in stride with other musicians.”

John Aram is a Heart of the City alumnus. He played with his band, Anjelitos, at our in-person music event at CO*LAB in August of 2021. He has played the festival in the past with other bands and works at the Bissell Centre as an advocate for the Fetal Alcohol Spectrum of Services (FASS) Program.

In Iran, where John is from, his mother would “drag” him out to her vocal and accordion lessons. “She would play accordion at the house all the time. Then she signed me up for piano once we got into Canada and I did that for a couple of years I think, and I just wasn’t super into it. I took a break from that,” John explains.

John knew he had to get a drum set after hearing Led Zeppelin’s _II _(on cassette) as well as the band Green Day as a teen. “I asked my dad for a drum set and he said no and my mom made him buy one. As you would figure, he was not very stoked because it’s really loud. He likes it now and he will actually come to shows and hang out.”

John is currently “maxed out” in three projects: “One is called Party Jacket and that is with Billie Zizi, Lindsay Pratt, and others. We have been together for a few years and we write little funky dancey quirky originals and do some covers. The other one is Angelitos which is Afro-Latin pop mainly from the songbook of Allan Suarez. We are playing at the Sasquatch Gathering this summer,” he says.

His latest project is Funk Cove, which he describes as “a collaboration between Mike Siek, Pat Pillay, myself, and two horn players, Brandy MacLean and Laurel Sadownik. We also brought in Louise Dawson [on vocals]. Pat, Mike, and I have been practicing the songs for over a year, and then once things cooled down a little with the pandemic we brought the horn players and finally Louise. It’s been a great collaboration because we do covers and we have three or four originals now.”

When I asked John what it’s like to be part of what he calls “a band family” he said, “It’s really challenging. You have to try your best to be supportive and check in on people and see how they are doing, as well as knowing when to compromise on an artistic vision and knowing when to just let people express themselves. I think it’s generally more important for people in the band to feel involved, to feel like they are contributing, than to necessarily have a strict idea.”

I asked John what thrills him. “What thrills me is making progress together in stride with other musicians, listening deeper, polishing up performances, and I love playing to a packed bar. That’s just the best thing. Getting t-shirts for the first time for Funk Cove is really thrilling too because I’ve never had band t-shirts before!”

If you want to check out one of Angelitos’, Party Jacket’s, or Funk Cove’s shows, you can look them up and follow them on social media. You can also order the new Funk Cove t-shirts through Funk Cove’s Facebook (@funkcove).

Corine Demas serves as volunteer President and Spoken Word Director of the Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton. Corine is passionate about poetry, storytelling, and her city, Edmonton. She lives in McCauley.

Local Pharmacist Discovers His Writing Talent

Whistle in the Dark: A Memoir by James Wu explores loss and life.

James Wu. Erin Wu

James Wu, a pharmacist at Market Drugs Medical on 97th Street, was devastated when his older sister, Fay Ying, died suddenly in January of 2016. The loss was so great that he had to quit work and seek medical help. One of the doctors suggested that he try writing as therapy.

“I was writing on sheets of Kleenex,” Wu says. “I constantly had a box of tissues beside me to wipe away the tears. Later, I looked at the wads of scribbled notes and thought, “There might be something here’.”

This is how Wu’s compelling and well-told memoir began. Then his wife and daughters encouraged him to publish, and a daughter’s friend, Belinda Ungaro, agreed to be the editor and publisher of what he calls a “Wu family COVID project.”

Wu’s parents and sister lived in a village in the impoverished farming region of Hoi Ping, China. When the leaders of the Maoist Revolution threatened to seize their land, the family decided to emigrate to Canada, landing in Vancouver, where James was born.

The family’s life as immigrants was arduous, poverty-stricken, and difficult in all sorts of ways. They prevailed, but when Wu became an orphan at age 13, Fay Ying – who was now married and living in Edmonton – took him in and helped him get an education. His pharmacy studies involved many part-time jobs on top of a heavy course load, but he did it, and he gives his sister credit for that success.

The book’s title refers to the way people summon up courage in the darkness by whistling. Which is what the Wu family had to do.

Wu says, “I was hesitant at first, but after doing a lot of soul-searching, I decided to ‘put myself out there.’ In my wildest dreams, never did I think the book would come this far. But if I could use our story to help others in any way, I think my sister would have approved.” 

The book, available at Amazon.ca, has sold nearly 200 copies so far at the time this article was written. All proceeds are being donated to the Greater Vancouver Food Bank, in honour of the city where Wu grew up and all of the memories it holds for him.

For more about Market Drugs Medical, click here.

Anita Jenkins is a retired writer and editor who lives in Boyle Street.

About Market Drugs Medical

Market Drugs Medical. Leif Gregersen

Pharmacist James Wu has worked at Market Drugs (10207 97th Street) throughout his four-decade-long career (see story here.). He says his job has given him insights into the McCauley, Boyle Street, and downtown communities. The store served people with methadone prescriptions, but also luminaries (former mayor and MLA Laurence Decore was a customer). And, in between, are the people who represent the diversity of McCauley: artists, entrepreneurs, seniors, social workers, recent and long-time immigrants, and many more.

Market Drugs, established in 1965 by Borys Ferbey and later operated by his son Mark, has always thrived and grown. When Wu first started working there, the business attracted a lot of customers of the former downtown farmers market next door (hence the name), as well as the W.W. Arcade hardware store and the Army & Navy department store. Under Mark’s management, it became a niche medical specialty store as well as a very busy pharmacy.  

Market Drugs Medical has supported Boyle McCauley News for many years by placing an ad in every issue. Market Drugs, The Italian Centre Shop, and the Italian Bakery were recognized at the paper’s 40th anniversary gala in 2019 as the three businesses that had advertised in the paper for the full 40 years.

Anita Jenkins is a retired writer and editor who lives in Boyle Street.

February-March 2022

Happy new year! By the time you read this, we will be at least a month into 2022. What is this year going to hold for Boyle McCauley News? We’re cautiously optimistic that this year our financial situation will improve and that the paper’s sustainability will increase.

Our Toss Us Your Toonies donation campaign continues. You can donate as little as $2 monthly. More information is at bmcnews.org/donate.

Our casino is scheduled to take place on April 17 and 18. If you are interested in volunteering, send me an email
(editor@bmcnews.org) and I will forward your information to Colleen Chapman, our Volunteer Coordinator.

Even if you are not in a position to donate or volunteer, you can still support the paper in other ways. If you use social media, you can follow us, like our posts, and share our content. Amplifying our social posts helps build our readership. We’re bmcnews on "Facebook":https://www.facebook.com/bmcnews and "Twitter":https://www.twitter.com/bmcnews, and bmcviews on Instagram.

In between our print issues, we also post fresh content at our website: bmcnews.org. We have a free e-newsletter that you can sign up for at our website. Check it out!

Until next time, thanks again for your support.

Connections, Part Two

In our previous issue I discussed how Boyle McCauley News connects the community in several ways:

  • We cover events and news not featured in other media.
  • The paper is the only way some people in the area find out about what is happening.
  • Volunteering with the paper connects people with their community.

When I reflect further, I realize that Boyle McCauley News is more than a community newspaper. It is a print and electronic communications platform with a large reach. It is a brand that people have come to know and trust. As a result, the paper is a resource to connect community members with information and assistance.

A recent example is a report of a lost pet. I posted the information on our social media, and the missing pet was located shortly thereafter. We were also recently contacted by senior residents in the area who needed help with snow removal. After posting the information online, a community member stepped up within the hour to help.

Sometimes I get a call from someone needing information about a community service. It may be something they heard about through an article or ad in the paper. Or, they just didn’t know who else to call. It always feels great to help someone out with something as simple as giving them the phone number for the organization they are trying to access.

Boyle McCauley News does a lot for the community above and beyond publishing a paper. We hope to keep on going for years to come.

Renewing Commitments

Dear friends,

As our beautiful fall transitions to winter, many of us are hunkering down, getting cozy, and taking some time to reflect. I know that this time of year is often seen as a time of rest. Caring for ourselves and our loved ones by making time and space for rest feels more important than ever right now.

As we move toward the new year, let’s get a head start on renewing some of our other commitments:

To students, teachers, and school communities, that we’ll keep doing our best to make sure that they can learn together safely.

To healthcare workers, that we’ll show our gratitude for their ceaseless hard work in the face of incredibly daunting challenges by respecting and supporting the work that they do, and their right to be protected while doing this work.

To our community, both individual members and the whole, that we will speak up for each other, protect each other, and keep each other safe and healthy as best as possible.

As we’ve returned to the Legislature this fall, please know that I’m continuing to work hard to fight for my constituents here in Boyle Street and McCauley and throughout Edmonton-Highlands-Norwood. By standing up for public healthcare, supporting a strong education system with a modern, relevant curriculum for students, fighting for workers, pushing for access to harm reduction, housing and other vital ground-level supports, and much more, I’ll continue to be your voice at every opportunity.

I hope that you are all healthy, safe, and finding joy and connection wherever possible. While our constituency office remains closed to visitors at this time, we are available via phone and email, and are working hard to stay in touch with all of you. I am here to help, so if you need anything, would like to share your thoughts or feedback, or if you’d just like to say hello, please reach out!

And, of course, please continue to take care of yourselves and each other.

Janis Irwin, MLA for
Edmonton-Highlands-Norwood
Email: Edmonton.HighlandsNorwood@assembly.ab.ca
Phone: 780-414-0682
Twitter / Facebook: JanisIrwin "Instagram":https://www.instagram.com/Janis.Irwin / "TikTok":https://www.tiktok.com/janis.irwin: @Janis.Irwin

Whose Community?

A Reminiscence of the Housing Crisis

The cover of the ARP that was developed in the early 90s, in which the community described how they would like to see that land used. Jim Gurnett

On a chilly afternoon in late November of 1999, people gathered for the first Edmonton rally to raise attention to the crisis of housing security in the city. They were on the corner of a block of land between 96th and 97th Streets, on the south side of 105A Avenue. The land was cluttered with scrap wood and metal here and there, but otherwise empty. South across the vacant land the headquarters of Edmonton Police Service (EPS) and the Alberta government’s John E. Brownlee Building could be seen.

At a rally to draw attention to the alarming rise in homelessness, the location of the event was appropriate. Steps away was the Bissell Centre where people struggling with poverty and, increasingly, experiencing homelessness, could find a variety of services.

And that block of land was significant. In 1993 and 1994 the Boyle Street/McCauley Planning Coordinating Committee had undertaken an extensive community process to design an area redevelopment plan (ARP) that would reflect the vision of community members. Central to the vision was to see land used in a way that would “develop a residential community which accommodates a broad mix of population and housing.”

The large empty area along 105A Avenue was clearly described in the plan, which was accepted by Edmonton City Council, as intended to be used for a rich mix of housing, small business, and related activities. It had the potential to make a significant contribution to a walkable, livable community.

But about the time of the rally, behind the scenes, in secret meetings, bureaucrats had other ideas. Commuter employees at the EPS and Brownlee Buildings wanted more parking. A plan was developed to have that block of land turned into parking lots for them. In a public meeting in the spring of 2001 community members were told this could be done without any public process if desired. A series of title trades had been agreed so that one part of the land would be the City’s and the other part, the Province’s.

Despite strong objections of community members, on July 4 of 2001, City Council voted (with four councillors opposing) to move forward with revising the ARP to permit use of the land for the parking lots, with one part of the area, held by the Province, kept as grass for the immediate future – although the right to develop it too as parking was reserved.

Voting against the proposal, Councillor Michael Phair said he was “flabbergasted” at the claims of City officials that they had no idea the community might be opposed to this dramatic change in the use of the land. “I think the City is complicit in this. I utterly reject the need for more surface parking lots in this area— there are plenty already. This proposal violates everything we want to do downtown and everything the community has shown through its ARP that it wants,” he declared.

Alberta Infrastructure officials speaking at the Council meeting said they did not believe public transportation was an acceptable option for the people working at their sites. (At the time, a second building belonging to the province, the Remand Centre, was also in use.) They indicated that the people working at the buildings were an economic benefit for the neighbourhood.

The development of the fenced parking lots went forward quickly, with one area in the northeast corner left as a grassed open area. Ironically, the one time this piece of turf saw some some use for housing was a few months in 2007 when it was the location of an encampment, until everyone was evicted and the grass too was fenced off to deny any further access to it.

In 2021, 27 years after community members described how this land could be an asset, and 22 years after the first civil society expression of concern at government failure to ensure decent housing for people, Edmonton has far more people enduring the misery of homelessness and tens of thousands more living in housing that is unaffordable or inadequate. Thousands of people have died too soon because of not having housing. Many more have been denied the basic human rights to live without want and in safety.

The land where community members described a future of housing and flourishing small businesses instead now hosts people living in tents and other inadequate shelters along the fenced area on the north side, and a daily stream of hundreds of vehicles coming and going from paved parking lots on most of the land.

National Housing Day happens on November 22. It was created in 1999 as a day for Canadians to be shamed by how we have allowed government indifference and worship of neoliberalism to destroy a decades-long commitment to ensuring that everyone has an adequate place to make home, and yet we are farther from that goal today than we were then.

Jim has been an advocate on housing security issues for many years, with Edmonton Coalition on Housing and Homelessness and individually, and a presenter to City Council when the parking lot development was being opposed.

McCauley: Active and Connected

Children lined up to play a game at the Annual Inner City Kids Safe Halloween Party on October 31st. Paula E. Kirman

Between the two of us, we’ve lived in 13 different Edmonton neighbourhoods. McCauley stands out as the most active and connected – by far! Here are just a handful of examples why.

October 31st marked the 26th anniversary of the Annual Inner City Kids Safe Halloween Party. The event attracted more than 120 kids and their families to the McCauley Rink for games, candy, hot apple cider, prizes, and a DJ spinning spooky tunes.

September 18th was Edmonton’s Community League Day. A party took place at the McCauley Rink, attracting 409 people. The event featured a bouncy obstacle course, balloon art, kids crafts and performances by DJ Creeasian, the ESO Brass Quintet, Prince Charles Métis Fiddlers, Ging Wu Martial Arts, and Manny Valencia’s Esquina Latina. Three hundred hot dogs, 400 beverages, and 100 pastries were given away – as well as 60 litter grabbers and 25 sharps containers!

2021 has been a very successful year for the McCauley Community League Soccer Program, with 70 kids registering to take part in weekly practices and non-competitive games at Giovanni Caboto Park. For the colder months the action continues indoors at the Edmonton Intercultural Centre. Kids are coming from across Edmonton to participate.

Litter Blitzes are regular fixtures on the McCauley calendar. Ten events have attracted 299 volunteers to remove 252 bags of litter from our neighbourhood. Four of these events have dovetailed with McCauley Clean Ups which have removed 156 pick up truck loads of illegally dumped junk and unwanted large items from the neighbourhood.

Dog Walkabouts are a fun way to meet neighbours, get some exercise, explore new areas of the neighbourhood, and be a positive presence on our streets. Four events have attracted 44 people to walk and talk with their neighbours.

The Piazza project brought nearly 100 investors together to solve a chronic commercial problem-property issue in the heart of McCauley. And now neighbours are coming together to explore the future of the Sacred Heart School – and to ensure that it becomes a community asset rather than a piece of real estate that exacerbates existing issues.

The list goes on: the Children’s Garden, front porch concerts, cooking classes, writing classes, ball hockey, cycling clinics . . . with the promise of much more on the horizon.

Credit and appreciation to the individuals and organizations for leading the way on these initiatives, including but certainly not limited to: Shelley Hollingsworth, Mike Siek, Coach Allan Suarez, Leif Gregersen, Ruth Sorochan, Ann Vriend, Albert Bernard, Kevin Jones, Yasushi Ohki, McCauley Community League, McCauley Revitalization, Safer McCauley, Viva Italia District, Boyle McCauley News, E4C, Edmonton Intercultural Centre, Chinatown Safety Council, Chinatown Transformation Collaborative, Boyle Street Ventures, McCauley Development Cooperative, Edmonton Community Development Company, Ever Active Schools, REACH Edmonton, MP Blake Desjarlais, MLA Janis Irwin, and Councillor Anne Stevenson. And, of course, to all McCauley neighbours for showing up for each other and our neighbourhood!

Mark is the Program Manager for REACH Edmonton’s Neighbourhood Organizing Initiative.
Alice is the President of the McCauley Community League Board.

Top 40 Under 40 Recipients Have Boyle Street and McCauley Connections

Lynsae Moon with her partner at the awards ceremony on November 8th. Supplied

Congratulations to Lynsae Moon, owner of The Nook Cafe, and Vikki Wiercinski, Boyle McCauley News_’ Designer and Advertising Coordinator, who were named to 2021’s Top 40 Under 40 list by _Edify Edmonton magazine in November. The prestigious annual awards are given to individuals making Edmonton a better place to live.

Moon has a deep commitment to social justice. She started Alberta’s first registered Suspended Coffee program, where customers can purchase buttons kept in a jar. Anyone can redeem a button for food and drinks at no cost. Despite The Nook Cafe’s location in Boyle Street being closed at the moment, she continues to care for her customers and community. The Nook currently has a booth at the Downtown Farmers Market on weekends until Christmas.

Wiercinski received the award for her work supporting local artists and other creatives by organizing the Royal Bison Art & Craft Fair. The event pivoted to an online fair due to COVID, and has continued to be hugely successful. She is also known for her textile and her stationary design work sold through her own business, Mezzaluna Studio.

The Woody Superpowers of Trees

Students planting Shrubscriber trees at W. P. Wagner School. Dustin Bajer

What if I told you that trees have superpowers? That sounds strange, but trees prevent floodings and drought, filter the air, decrease extreme temperatures, and increase nearby property values. As we increasingly feel the effects of climate change, trees provide a host of abilities capable of making our homes and communities more resilient.

With this in mind, in 2014, I started growing trees in my McCauley backyard. I quickly accumulated hundreds of fruit (apricot, plums, mulberries), nut (walnut, hazelnut, and oak), and ornamental (Maple, Kentucky Coffee, and American Beech) trees. What am I doing with all of those trees, you ask? Ideally, getting them into the hands of local school and community partners – which is why I created Shrubscriber.com.

Shrubscriber, pronounced “Shrub-Scriber,” is a community of passionate Edmontonians growing climate-resilient communities through tree donations. Members fund 3, 6, or 12 trees for local school and community projects while connecting with like-minded folks, classes, and events.

By Matching a Tree’s Superpowers With Local Needs, We Can Grow Healthier Communities.

Let’s take a look at some of these superpowers:

The Food Grower – Trees and shrubs that produce edible fruits, berries, nuts, or leaves and contribute to community food security year after year. Eg.: Plums, Walnuts, Mulberries

The Air Cleaner – Plants that tolerate urban pollution and are good at removing particulates from the landscape – letting us breathe easier. Eg.: Silver Maple, Honeylocust, Pine, Yew

The Storyteller – Plants with a local historical or cultural connection. Eg.: Holowash Tree, The Latta Maple, Stark Oak, Chinatown Goji

The Shade Caster – Shade trees reduce extreme heat by up to 10-25°C, reducing energy costs. Eg.: Walnuts, Honeylocust, Oak, Ginkgo

The Native Guardian – Well-adapted to our historical climate, native plants have relationships with local birds, animals, and pollinators. Eg.: Black Poplar, Tamarack

The Biodiversity Builder – Trees that increase our urban forest’s biodiversity and resilience by decreasing susceptibility to pests, diseases, and climate change. E.g.: Walnuts, Honeylocust, Oak, Catalpa

The Beautifier – Trees species selected for their colour, flowers, or pleasant growth habit. Often flowering, these plants have been shown to increase mental well-being and property values. Eg.: Flowering Quince, Catalpa, Locust

Visit Shrubscriber.com to learn more about community tree planting. If you know of a group that’s looking for trees, send an email to dustinbajertrees@gmail.com.

Dustin lives in McCauley.

New Boyle Street Neighbourhood Playground

Grand opening scheduled for the spring of 2022.

A rendering of the new Boyle Street playground. Courtesy of City of Edmonton

Updated December 22, 2021: Post from the Boyle Street Community League’s Facebook page

Work on the Boyle Street Plaza playground is being stopped due to the snow and extreme cold temperature we had last week and being forecasted again for later this week. These conditions will cause a complete freezing of the ground and with that the ability to complete the final concrete pour for the trench drain that surrounds the playground area and completing the poured in place rubber surfacing has ended until spring.

The area will remain closed off with the existing construction fencing remaining in place until the project is completed in the spring. Additionally a second construction fence is being installed around the playground area itself as an additional deterrent to people entering that area.

—-

The children of Boyle Street now have a wonderful new playground at the Boyle Street Plaza. “It is a great addition to the neighbourhood, one that was much needed,” says Kathryn Hutchison, project manager, City of Edmonton.

Hutchison oversaw a community engagement process that involved the Boyle Street Community League and the YMCA of Northern Alberta (which occupies a major portion of the Boyle Street Plaza building). A team of community representatives led by Joelle Reiniger worked with the City to choose a location and select a design. The construction contract was awarded to GrassChopper Landscaping, the equipment contractor was Playquest, and the playground equipment was supplied and installed by Questic Contracting.

Features of the playground include the traditional equipment for sliding, climbing, swinging, and bouncing, along with a rubber pour-in-place surface, good lighting, and seating for family members and caregivers.

A surprising number of children live in Boyle Street and downtown.

Reiniger met Nicole Morin when their children were playing together in front of Boyle Street Plaza. Morin lives in the YMCA Village (Melcor), just across from the site of the new playground. So when Reiniger mentioned the project, Morin’s eyes lit up. Did Morin, who is Indigenous, have some ideas? Yes she did. Thanks to Morin’s participation, the playground features signage depicting the seven sacred teachings: love, courage, respect, truth, humility, honesty, and wisdom. It was also Morin’s idea to have a tandem swing, which accommodates a child and adult swinging together.

“The team was involved in selecting the equipment,” Reiniger says. “We asked for a place that children will return to, day after day, and one that serves older as well as younger kids. There will be a barrier to protect users from 103 Avenue traffic, and clear sightlines. We think it provides a respite within the downtown environment.”

A grand opening is planned for the spring of 2022. This event will celebrate a community space that is significant for many reasons. First, it is a safe place in an inner city, urban environment. Also, it is a neutral public open space where parents and children can socialize and hold events. This is especially important in an area where many families live in apartments and do not have back yards. “A surprising number of children live in Boyle Street and downtown,” Reiniger says.

Perhaps the most significant fact about the project is this: it is the second new downtown playground in recent years. (The McKay Avenue School site was first.) “Something that had not happened for decades,” Reiniger says.

Anita Jenkins is a retired writer and editor who lives in Boyle Street.

A Block Carrier Reflects

Since 2015, I’ve had the privilege of delivering Boyle McCauley News to a couple of blocks around 93/92 Streets, between 107A and 106A Avenues. With new opportunities coming up, sadly I’ve now had to give up the routes, which got me reflecting on my experience as a Block Carrier.

I’ve enjoyed witnessing the little changes that would take place in between the delivery of each issue. A new mailbox installed. A new front porch stairwell. A broken gate. The seasonal changes of the old Green Ash trees shedding beautiful leaves in the fall and streams of sunshine and shadow through the branches onto the street and sidewalks.

Delivering papers along these streets, I’m always torn between the sense of community I can see and feel there and the stigma McCauley holds in the minds of many Edmontonians. I would see many indicators of challenges, such as a house with its front gate locked at the sidewalk so you can’t walk all the way up to the door. One house got some press in 2019 after being featured on CBC’s investigative podcast, Slumtown. Shortly afterwards it burned to the ground, taking a neighbouring home along with it. An old boat sat nearby, seemingly abandoned on a vacant lot.

At the same time, I’ve also been greeted with kindness by residents working on their front lawn and chatting with friends on the porch. I saw a vacant lot get transformed into an integrated community garden.

When I had extra papers I would offer them to people walking through the neighbourhood, people who at first glance may be unhoused. From my time volunteering in McCauley as a block connector with the Abundant Community Edmonton (ACE) program, it was clear that for meaningful change to take place, community has to be defined beyond people who own and rent. There are others in the inner city who spend their time accessing meals, supports, and services in the area. Boyle McCauley News is a resource for these community members as well. In this way, the Block Carrier truly serves the community as a whole.

Thank you to the 92/93 Street – 106A/107A Avenue residents for the valuable time I’ve spent walking your sidewalks. And I wish all the best to Boyle McCauley News and its amazing team. Thank you for creating a community newspaper that is meant for everyone in Boyle Street and McCauley.

If you are interested in becoming a Block Carrier, contact editor@bmcnews.org to find out what routes are available.

Fresh Sushi From a Pizza Place?

Beef tataki. Alan Schietzsch

Eat-Sushi.ca
Located in: Royal Pizza Hys Centre
Address: #102, 11010 – 101 Street
Phone: 780-800-9975
Hours: Tues.-Sat.: 11 a.m.–3 p.m., 5–8 p.m.
Sundays: 11a.m.–7:30 p.m.
Monday: Closed
Menu: eat-sushi.ca

My tummy’s starting to ask for food, and sure enough, I pull out my smartphone and scroll around the map to see what local restaurant I might not have visited lately. What’s this? There’s sushi nearby, from a place I haven’t even heard of? And I thought I knew local food.

I look again at the location on the map…is that in the Hys Centre? I stroll over to 101 Street. Yes, there’s Royal Pizza right there, but on looking closer there’s a little sign for Eat-Sushi.ca on the same door! I poke my head in. It looks like a pizza place, mostly doing take-out, which is no surprise during the pandemic. So I ask, “Is there sushi here?”

The bright and friendly server behind the counter comes out to answer my questions. While it is a restaurant with tables for dining in, it turns out they’re mostly making food ordered via those online delivery services like DoorDash and UberEats. Chefs running “almost secret” restaurants like this call these places “ghost kitchens.” During the pandemic these kitchens have flourished as people couldn’t dine out as usual.

Are ghost kitchens as good as they are numerous? You bet! This one space is two different ghost kitchens – Eat-Sushi.ca and Eat-Thai.ca – sharing the same large commercial kitchen with their friends who run Royal Pizza. Each of the three has separate menus you can find online or pick up in person. I was already there, so sat down to look at the Eat-Sushi.ca menu.

The fare is billed as “creative high quality food.” That translates to a wide menu with various combinations of maki rolls, smaller hoso maki, separate nigiri sushi pieces, side orders like tempura, miso soup, and edamame beans, as well as a few more unique items.

The beef tataki appetizer was a hit, and I was amazed at the presentation, which was more beautiful to look at than the menu photos promised. How often does that ever happen? The beef slices were cooked to a perfect rare, cut consistently thin, accompanied by kabayaki dipping sauce and artfully twirled vegetable garnishes straight out of a glossy gourmet magazine. This wasn’t just “take-out quality” food: it was top quality, fresh, and better-looking than many fancy expensive places.

I asked for recommendations on maki rolls, and tried the “super crunch roll,” which genuinely was creative as promised. Using smoked salmon from Fin’s seafood, the chef had combined crispy yam for texture and a sriracha aioli to offset the smoke with a tangy counterpoint. It was modern, fresh, and fun, and certainly not your now boring old-school sushi. The next selection, the “lobster sensation roll” was just as attractive and tasty, with mango and scallion rounding out the flavours and lightening the rich lobster and crabmeat.

Everything I tried was beautifully arranged and garnished, with unexpectedly modern and elegant styling as well as fresh and varied flavours.

If you’re in the area or just want to order something conveniently, Eat-Sushi.ca is a hidden secret that’s worth knowing about, and I hope they’re a part of the McCauley food scene for the long term.

Alan lives in McCauley. He is the Chair of the paper’s Board of Directors.

Summer Soccer Gold

An amazing thing happened this summer. My daughter, age nine, had the opportunity to play free, community, non-competitive soccer in our beautiful Giovanni Caboto Park. It happened because many folks came together, with a generous amount of drive from neighbour Allan Suarez. This was a chance to create real connection and build neighbourhood friendships between children and families through sport and play.

Allan saw a need and was uniquely placed to make it happen in this season of COVID community spirit. It was with his passion for the game and the skills that he could offer coaching for kiddos from ages 4 to 14. His dedication included bringing equipment and goal posts and soccer balls and pinnies every week, and then doing it again. Allan would come out early and stay late, setting up real goal nets on the goalposts and generally pouring his heart into helping kids have fun and gain skills, both physical and social.

Also, a shout-out of gratitude for new McCauley Community League board members Regan Gee and Alice Kos for the important work to get the program started, and to neighbours Dave and Krista Williamson who showed up so often to help prepare and for safety field checks. There were many other folks who were able to help, and it all meant that this chance to play soccer could actually happen.We are so lucky.

I loved seeing the littles and the bigger kids at the field in the sunshine come and play together. I loved seeing children, including my daughter, come running up to and circling Allan and calling him coach, so genuinely happy and interested in playing the game. I loved seeing the older kids and teenagers coming early to the park while littles were having their lessons and then hanging out and playing together. It was a heartening and beautiful way to spend a summer evening. I was always glad to help.

It was a hopeful and happy program, even more so because it continues this autumn and into the winter at the old McCauley School (now the Intercultural Centre), with the support of parent and community volunteers. Soccer games and skill-building continue weekly on Saturdays. Alan is not a rare soul in this community. There are many such generous spirits, though it is important to admire and acknowledge and support each other and offer gratitude for such beautiful happenings. Thank you, Allan Suarez.

Ruth lives in McCauley with her partner and daughter.

An Afternoon with Anne Stevenson

Anne Stevenson. Supplied

I recently had a brief afternoon video chat with our newly-elected City Councillor for Ward O-day’min, Anne Stevenson. Our time together was delightful, comfortable, and gave us a chance to speak about our community.

Anne brings an abundance of experience and knowledge to her position. Anne’s background is as an urban planner with a passion for building an equitable city that serves all residents. She holds an undergraduate degree in international development and economics, as well as a Master’s in city design. After 10 years of working and traveling abroad, Anne returned to her hometown of Edmonton in 2012. She spent seven years at the City of Edmonton and was working at the Right at Home Housing Society prior to the election.

Housing is an issue in every community, but in ours affordable and accessible housing has been an issue for a while. Another major issue is residential upkeep of our streets and safety. Anne believes our city can do more, and she plans on keeping these concerns in the spotlight. Issues can be brought forward to Anne by members of the community. Anne understands the importance of community members in the decision-making process, so your ideas and concerns are encouraged.

Anne’s campaign office was located in the Piazza in McCauley, so she spent a lot of time here and was able to witness a lot of the area’s character. She spoke to me about diversity, getting aging and closed buildings assessed, and attracting new neighbours and businesses.

Anne struck me as a very good listener, and as our interview was done via video, her smile was abundant. When asked about highlights of our community, she mentioned many favourites: Giovanni Caboto Park, The Italian Centre, and Sorrentino’s.

Welcome Anne! We look forward to many pleasant and enriching encounters in our community.

Anne can be reached by phone at 780-496-8333 or by email at: anne.stevenson@edmonton.ca

Ian is a columnist with the paper. He lives in the area.

Safer McCauley: November Event Updates

Here are some upcoming community events happening in McCauley in November:

MCCAULEY CHINATOWN LITTER BLITZ
WHEN: Saturday, November 13 @10:50 a.m. to noon (clean up starts at 11am)
WHERE: Meet at Pacific Rim Mall (97 St & 105 Ave; ground floor by HSBC)

Chinatown Transformation Collaborative, Chinatown Safety Council, and Safer McCauley invite volunteers to participate in a one-hour McCauley Chinatown Litter Blitz. All materials will be supplied (litter grabbers, bags, gloves, sanitizer). Please wear a mask. AHS and City of Edmonton COVID guidelines will be observed. Stay for a dim sum lunch afterwards, sponsored by McCauley Revitalization! Our last 9 Litter Blitzes removed 212 bags of litter from our neighbourhood!

MCCAULEY COMMUNITY CONVERSATION – DRUG POISONING (OVERDOSE) CRISIS
WHEN: Tuesday, November 23, from 7 to 8:30 p.m. (please join 5 to 10 minutes early)
WHERE: Virtual by Zoom (Eventbrite registration below)

Alberta Health Services has identified McCauley as the neighbourhood in Edmonton most affected by drug overdoses. A committee called Partners in Drug Poisoning Prevention (PDPP) is planning to launch a neighbourhood awareness campaign about the overdose crisis, beginning in McCauley. Before this takes place, community members are invited to come together to share their experiences and observations of the crisis. This is an opportunity for us to have an open, informal, and supportive community conversation. It will also be an opportunity for us to gather information to help shape PDPP’s campaign – and let them know what we’d like to learn about the overdose crisis. Presented by Safer McCauley and the McCauley Community League.

Eventbrite Registration (w/ Zoom meeting link): https://mccauleypartnersindrugpoisoningprevention.eventbrite.ca

MCCAULEY DOG WALKABOUT
WHEN: Tuesday, November 30 @ 6:50 p.m. (we walk at 7 p.m.!)
WHERE: Meet at Giovanni Caboto Park fountain

The monthly McCauley Dog Walkabout is back! Thanks to all who came out in October. Join your neighbours for a 30-minute “pack walk.” Meet at Giovanni Caboto Park fountain. Meet new friends, get some exercise, and explore a different part of our neighbourhood every month. All are welcome. And dogs are optional! Brought to you by Safer McCauley and the McCauley Community League.

To stay connected to McCauley/Chinatown events and news, please like/follow:

https://www.facebook.com/safermccauley
https://www.facebook.com/mccauleycommunityleague
https://www.facebook.com/bmcnews
https://www.facebook.com/yegchinatownsafetycouncil
https://www.facebook.com/CTCYEG1

Mark Davis is the Program Manager, Neighbourhood Organizing Initiative with REACH Edmonton.

Explore the Library

“The only thing that you absolutely have to know, is the location of the library.” – Albert Einstein (Theoretical Physicist, 1879-1955)

We are approaching 2022. While we look back on what we have come through and learned, the libraries have been slowly, safely reopening.

We have the Edmonton Public Library’s main branch, the newly-renovated Stanley A. Milner Library, very near us. Located at 7 Sir Winston Churchill Square, the library was built on that site to commemorate Canada’s Centennial in 1967. In fact, it was known as the Centennial Library until 1996 when it was renamed after Stanley Albert Milner. He was someone who held many diverse positions in many fields, even making a run for mayor in 1963. Milner was the chair of The Edmonton Library Board until 1968.

Libraries can be information centres, pleasant places to relax and browse books, hubs of resources, and sources of entertainment. The Milner library contains much more than books. It boasts many new, fully accessible areas, with services such as Wi-Fi, public computers, printing, photocopying, scanning, and study rooms. In addition, there is now a larger Children’s section and a space for gamers! Another very cool part of this library is the Makerspace, where you can record music, do book binding, print things in 3D, and do a lot of other interesting things.

Like most public places at this time, mandatory masking and capacity regulations are in place. For more information, visit https://www.epl.ca/locations/EPLMNA/ or call (780) 496-7070.

Ian is a columnist with the paper. He lives in the area.

How You Can Support Boyle McCauley News

No donation is too small. It all adds up and helps us towards our goal of financial sustainability. However, if you are in a position to contribute a substantial amount, here are some numbers to guide you. These estimates are calculated for a 12 page issue.

  • The TOTAL cost of one issue: $4275 (This includes printing, editing, volunteer coordination, layout/design, distribution, and bookkeeping.)
  • The cost of PRINTING one issue: $1100
  • 10% of the cost of one issue: $427.50
  • 10% of the cost of PRINTING one issue: $110
  • Communications (Internet, telephone) annually: $1500

How to Donate

Online
You can donate online via PayPal at our website:
https://bmcnews.org/donate
Your donation can be one-time, or you can set up a monthly donation schedule.

Interac E-Transfer
Send an e-transfer to accounting@bmcnews.org, and put “BMC News Donation” in the “message” field.

Cheque
Send your cheque, made payable to “Boyle McCauley News” to:
9613 111 Avenue NW
Edmonton, AB T5G 0A9

Please note that we cannot provide income tax receipts for donations.

What is Boyle McCauley News?

The goals of the paper include:

  • To be a vehicle, through which community organizations can inform local residents of their services and activities, providing opportunities to be involved in the neighbourhood.
  • To be a voice for residents who wish to express their concerns, interests, and ideas.
  • To report on local issues and events in the community or are of community interest.
  • To work cooperatively with the local businesses regarding advertising services and points of interest.
  • To be a community-based newspaper that strives towards financial self-sufficiency and which functions through the use of volunteers.

December 2021 - January 2022

Much of our energy this year behind the scenes at Boyle McCauley News has been occupied with keeping the paper sustainable.

Many of you have been helping us achieve that goal through our Toss Us Your Toonies donation campaign where you can donate as little as $2 monthly. More information is at bmcnews.org/donate. Some of you also responded to our plea for help in our previous issue, as well as our public service announcement videos that have been running weekly on our social media.

The paper has been in this situation before, and we have survived. I am optimistic that we are going to turn a corner and make it through until our next casino – which now is scheduled to happen in the spring of 2022 – and beyond. We are going to continue fundraising full force with raffles, events, and other ways to make sure we hopefully never find ourselves in this position again. Your help is contributing to this goal, and for that, we thank you.

Remember to follow us, like our posts, and share our content on social media: bmcnews on "Facebook":https://www.facebook.com/bmcnews and "Twitter":https://www.twitter.com/bmcnews, and bmcviews on Instagram. We also post fresh content at our website: bmcnews.org. Thank you again for your continued support.

Community Connections

Back in September I began filming a series of short videos to share on social media. The videos feature a variety of local residents, business owners, and other stakeholders talking about the importance of Boyle McCauley News and why people should support the community newspaper in the quest to be sustainable and keep publishing.

One statement that kept coming up over and over again was how the paper is a connector. It connects people with places, events, and each other. Through its coverage, Boyle McCauley News promotes local businesses and performance venues. We promote local events, many of which are not covered elsewhere. We also feature notable people doing incredible things.

But we also provide a connection to the community for many people who lack internet access or computer skills. For some, Boyle McCauley News is the only way they find out about what is happening in their own neighbourhood. This is why we are committed to continuing to publish print editions, even as more and more publications are going completely online. We put a lot of time and effort into our website and social media as well, but our focus as a grassroots community newspaper means that we want to continue to reach the demographics that other media may be neglecting.

The paper also connects people in the community through volunteering. We’re always looking for writers and photographers, Block Carriers (in McCauley) and Apartment Ambassadors/Condo Connectors (in Boyle Street). Interested? Contact me any time at editor@bmcnews.org.

Meet Blake Desjarlais

Edmonton Griesbach’s new MP brings renewed energy and representation to the area.

Blake Desjarlais. Blake Loates

Blake Desjarlais was elected Member of Parliament for Edmonton Griesbach on September 20. His election is a political turning point in the area, as he is with the NDP after the area being a Conservative stronghold for years. As well, he is the only Indigenous MP from Alberta and the country’s first openly Two-Spirit MP. He considers his representation as Indigenous and Two-Spirit “a tremendous honour and one I hope begins to shed light on the importance of inclusion and diversity in Canada.”

Desjarlais, who is Métis and in his late 20s, both represents the area and is part of the community. “As a resident of Boyle Street I know first hand how beautiful, unique, and wonderful our community is. But I also understand many of the poverty issues we are currently experiencing and want to play a meaningful role to ensure all persons who call our neighbourhood home feel safe, secure, and dignified.”

He wants “to ensure we look at strengthening our social supports while maintaining our communities diversity and community members, whether through partnering with some of our amazing community organizations or working with my federal colleagues in Ottawa to ensure faster, more robust, solutions that tackle poverty, mental health, and addictions with care and compassion.”

The abundance of public art in the area is one of Desjarlais’ favourite things about McCauley and Boyle Street. “I truly believe art has the power to make us stop in our tracks, reflect on the path we take, and offer us the chance to continue or correct that path,” he says.

“My favourite art piece in our neighbourhood is the ‘Water Is Life’ Mural at iHuman by Issac Murdoch and Christie Belcourt. The simple and beautiful teachings of the importance of water and land come together in this deeply powerful and loving piece.”

Desjarlais describes the area as “a proven champion of compassion, community, and love. We come together for those who need shelter, food, or a human to chat with. We have tremendous heart that I know will influence Canada to also be better. Thank you, hiy-hiy, Kinanaskomtin, Boyle Street and McCauley for being you.”

Boyle McCauley News Needs Block Carriers

Hello community members! If you are interested in becoming a Block Carrier, we have a number of routes available in McCauley. Most routes take 30-45 minutes, papers are dropped off at your home, and we provide all information and instructions. Volunteers are acknowledged in the paper and are invited to our volunteer appreciation events (once we can start having them again!).

If you are interested in any of the routes below, contact editor@bmcnews.org

AVAILABLE ROUTES:

Route 1:

West: 98 St
East: 97 St.
North: 110 Ave.
South: 107A Ave.
Only west side of 98 St.
100 papers

Route 2:

West: 101 St.
East: 101 St.
North: 111 Ave.
South: 106 Ave.
50 papers

Route 3:

West: 97 St.
East: 97 St.
North: 107 Ave.
South 105 Ave.
One copy to businesses (except Lucky 97, where we drop off papers separately)
50 papers

Updated October 27, 2021

Housing Opportunities in McCauley from the Edmonton Community Development Company

Wyser Manor Supplied

From students to professionals, Wyser Manor is designed for minimalist living. People who are community orientated, environmentally conscious, and pedestrian focused.

Unit 5, 9315-108A Avenue is available November 1st.

Newly-renovated 1 bedroom micro-suite, 400 sq.ft.

Rent: $725.00/month

INCLUDED:
Power
Heat
Water

Non-smoking
No Pets

For inquires, email: rent@edmontoncdc.org
http://edmontoncdc.org/wyserliving/

Also: 9316 – 109 Avenue

Coming soon! The Edmonton CDC is excited to bring a brand new duplex to McCauley located at 9316 – 109 Avenue. Follow us on Instagram and Facebook for updates and details @edmontoncdc

Mikayla Bortscher: Emerging as a Poet and Musician

Mikayla Bortscher. Supplied

Mikayla Bortscher is an emerging poet and musician who worked with Heart of the City, in conjunction with CreArt, to produce this summer’s Heart of the City Youth Stage Live Stream Series.

I asked Mikayla how it went. She said, “We had a lot of really great performers. It went smoothly. It was great collaborating and meeting new people. I got to meet other Edmonton artists.”

The inspiration for Mikayla to become a musician was natural. “Playing harp is something I always wanted to do. It’s kind of just something that’s in me. When I was very little I had a book called Gwinna which had a picture of a girl with a harp. I had a toy harp when I was 12. I saved up my whole life to buy it and I got a little help from my mom. It was only $200 which is still a lot of money and it isn’t a real harp. It only has 20 strings, but I used to play with it all the time. I would spend hours in my yard.”

I asked her what gave her the courage to start playing harp seriously as an adult. “I was on this existential bent because I was entering my first year of university and I realized that I hadn’t done any of the things that I had set out to do when I was a kid. I also realized that I should just go ahead and call a harpist.”

She looked up harpists and found Terry McDade, whose CD she had when she was a kid. “I knew his style. I really liked learning from Terry. He is a great person and a great teacher.”

Mikayla also performed poetry at Heart of the City’s Beat Spoken Word Variety Show. “I write fairly simple forms but I like to use big ideas in my poetry,” she says. “I don’t use big ideas in my songwriting. I have more complex poetry. I find that when people are reading poetry they really want to understand something or they want to learn or hear something, but when someone is listening to a song they don’t always want a message. Sometimes they just want to lay back and listen to a tune.”

In the future Mikayla plans to record an album of music and tour with it. She also says, “I want to teach poetry workshops. I’m hoping to do a Master’s in poetics. I will probably never get a job teaching at a university but I will definitely run workshops around the city. I want to connect poetry and therapy.”

Mikayla performed at the first Heart of the City Live Stream event in early June and was surprised at how many views it got after it was posted online. You can watch the Heart of the City Youth Stage Live Stream series by going to CreArt Edmonton’s Facebook page or checking out @heartcityfest on Facebook.

Corine Demas serves as volunteer President and Spoken Word Director of the Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton. Corine is passionate about poetry, storytelling, and her city, Edmonton. She lives in McCauley.

Success and Challenges Discussed at Farmers Market AGM

People in attendance at the Friends of the Edmonton Downtown Farmers Market AGM. Supplied

The Friends of the Edmonton Downtown Farmers Market held their second AGM at the market building on Tuesday, September 7th. About a dozen people sat in socially distanced chairs, wearing masks, as Chair Jill Wright and Secretary Tom Boyce conducted the meeting.

The Friends’ aim is to support the market and its vendors as well as local food producers. Covid-19 has severely limited the Friends’ ability to set up programs. Even so, in the past year they have launched the Reading the Table book club (led by board member Virginia Durksen), applied for grants, and hosted a membership table at the market. They have also discussed ideas for tours of buildings and farms, long table feasts and fundraisers.

Dieter Kuhlmann, member of the market’s board of directors, spoke to the group about the market’s potential and challenges, and about his experiences as a long-time market vendor and head of the family business, Kuhlmann’s Greenhouse Garden Market. In addition to reporting on the market’s progress, Kuhlmann entertained his audience with quips about buying a suit for $30 in the Army and Navy, the store where the market is now located, and about how he kept his business afloat by telling his children, “You’re not going anywhere.”

For more information, visit the Friends Facebook page, https://www.facebook.com/FEDFMS.

Heart of the City Pop-Up

Angie and the iNkleiNs. George Ellis

Heart of the City hosted a day of live music, art, and poetry in a safe and socially distanced setting at CO*LAB on August 21st.

Photos by George Ellis

September 2021 Safer McCauley Updates

Here are some upcoming community events.

MCCAULEY CHINATOWN LITTER BLITZ
WHEN: Sat, Sept 11 @10:50am to noon (clean up starts at 11am)
WHERE: Meet at Marble Fountain (corner of 97 St & 107 Ave, by Lucky 97 Market)

Safer McCauley, Chinatown Safety Council, and Chinatown Transformation Collaborative invite volunteers to participate in a McCauley Chinatown Litter Blitz. All materials will be supplied (litter grabbers, bags, gloves, sanitizer, and masks). Refreshments and light snacks will be available afterwards. AHS and City of Edmonton COVID guidelines will be observed. Our last 7 Litter Blitzes removed 141 bags of litter form our neighbourhood!

MCCAULEY COMMUNITY LEAGUE DAY PARTY
WHEN: Sat, Sept 18 @11am to 4pm
WHERE: McCauley Rink (10750-96 St)

McCauley Community League and Safer McCauley invite neighbors, friends, and visitors to celebrate Community League Day. Featuring performances by DJ Creeasian, The Prince Charles Fiddlers, Edmonton Symphony Orchestra Brass Quintet, free food and drinks, and loads of family fun! Supported by City of Edmonton McCauley Revitalization.

MCCAULEY COMMUNITY CONVERSATION – DRUG POISONING CRISIS
WHEN: Sun, Sept 26 @3pm to 4:30pm
WHERE: Giovanni Caboto Park

Drug poisonings have increased dramatically. AHS has identified McCauley as the neighbourhood most affected. Partners in Drug Poisoning Prevention (PDPP) plans to launch a neighbourhood awareness campaign about the crisis, starting in McCauley. Before this takes place, Safer McCauley and McCauley Community League invite all community members to an informal meeting to discuss what we are experiencing in our neighbourhood. This is McCauley’s chance to determine what we’d like to get out of PDPP’s campaign and let them know what we’d like to learn about the drug poisoning crisis.

To stay connected to McCauley/Chinatown events and news, please like/ follow:
https://www.facebook.com/safermccauley
https://www.facebook.com/mccauleycommunityleague
https://www.facebook.com/bmcnews
https://www.facebook.com/yegchinatownsafetycouncil
https://www.facebook.com/CTCYEG1

Mark is Program Manager for REACH Edmonton’s Neighbourhood Organizing Initiative. He can be contacted at mark.davis@reachedmonton.ca

The Auricle Project

Decolonizing community wellness research.

InWithForward is a “social design shop” in Vancouver who have launched a project in Edmonton called, “Auricle.” The project is located in Alberta Avenue.

Natalie Napier of InWIthForward told me, “We are trying to redesign the social welfare state with values like agency, autonomy, and connection. Auricle is a prototype of the InWithForward team in partnership with the Recover Urban Wellness initiative out of the City of Edmonton.”

The project is collecting anonymous “mini stories” from community members about their well-being. From a pamphlet about the initiative: “By focusing on stories, we want to know how you are well, not just if you are well.” After telling your story, you will be asked to share your interpretation of these stories and some demographic questions [unclear: are they being asked demographic questions or are they being asked to share their interpretation of demographic questions?]. The reason why they want to know so many demographic details is that, “Without understanding who submitted the data, we may reduce, generalize, or erase the specific experiences of specific identities and communities.”

Napier says, “We are trying to prototype some anti-oppressive approaches and decolonial approaches to research. We wanted to make sure that folks who may not traditionally take part in a process like this had some neighbourhood ownership and a chance for people to participate, so we hired ‘local listeners.’ We hired people with different language skills and different backgrounds to go out and ask people to share stories and to go find some folks who otherwise might not participate.” 

We hired people with different language skills and different backgrounds to go out and ask people to share stories and to go find some folks who otherwise might not participate.

McCauley’s Dana Wylie is one of the “local listeners.” She told me, “I ended up going to Boyle Street Community Services, where they hold bike maintenance events for people could take their bikes and get them fixed for free. That ended up being a perfect place to sit and chat with folks. The people I talked to there had lived rough on the street at some point, and I found them to have insightful and inspiring perspectives on well-being and what it even means, and what is important to them. They have all learned some incredibly profound lessons, and have a kind of wisdom the dominant population doesn’t have. Working on this project has given me the gift of connecting to that wisdom and perspective, enough to realize that there’s much in it that we all need right now.”

Ivy Staker of InWithForward said, “We are also going to have all of our local listeners’ bios on the website. If you would like to schedule a time to speak to someone, you can email us at info@auricle.com and we can try to help you out to get that set up.”

There is also the do-it-yourself solo version online. You can tell your story by going to www.auricle.info. After you submit your story and answer the demographic questions, you can choose to receive an email with a $5 gift certificate to The Carrot Cafe. Natalie Napier said, it is “our way of saying, ‘Have a coffee on us.’ Then you will be invited to join what is called a ‘sense-making session.’ That’s optional, for people who are feeling keen, people who are curious to read other peoples stories and see how they compare to your own.”  

The interactive sense-making sessions will happen in October (exact dates to be determined) to “share back data and stories with the community, to collectively make sense of what these stories are telling us, and to help shape the bigger story this data might tell. All community members will be welcome!” says Staker.

Staker adds, “We hope that journalists and curious people of all stripes will ask for access to the data. We can send particular story sets about particular things they are interested in and maybe do some of their own thinking about what that means for their neighbourhood. We want people to start conversations, bring it to community groups they are involved in, and give the data life beyond our involvement.”

Corine Demas serves as volunteer President and Spoken Word Director of the Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton. Corine is passionate about poetry, storytelling, and her city, Edmonton. She lives in McCauley.

McCauley Soccer Scores!

Children’s soccer in Caboto Park. Ruth Sorochan

“You have a kid from Iraq, a kid from Dubai, a kid from Ghana, and a soccer ball. They don’t need to speak the same language. Soccer is the universal language.” – Ricardo Casanova, founder of YEG Soccer Society.

A Google search results in countless quotes about soccer being a universal language. It’s become a bit of a cliché. But like many other clichés, it exists because it’s true. And that truth has been on display this summer on the soccer fields of McCauley.

On a beautiful evening in July, 150 people were at Giovanni Caboto Park, with most of them there to enjoy the soccer program. By August, 70 kids between the ages of 2.5 and 14 were registered. Nothing reflects the vibrancy of a neighbourhood quite like children playing in a park while their families meet, make new friends, and share stories.

McCauley’s soccer program is free and accessible to all, regardless of background, economic means, or age. The program features weekly Tuesday evenings for kids, and Sunday afternoons where adults and kids drop in to play together. And lending more meaning to the slogan “Meet Me in McCauley,” the program welcomes participants from nearby communities like Alberta Avenue and Parkdale, as well as more distant communities like Lessard.

The driving force behind this year’s soccer program is coach Allan Suarez, who also works with Free Play for Kids (formerly Free Footie) – the program that gave Bayern Munich superstar, Alphonso Davies, his start! Coach Allan’s approach balances kindness and inclusion with the teaching of core skills. “Every child deserves a space to play with others and to explore movement, speed, and agility in a safe, inclusive environment,” he says.

Logistical support from the McCauley Community League has allowed Coach Allan to devote his attention to the kids on the field. And he has done so with passion and patience. “The children, youth, and volunteers have shown enthusiasm and hard work,” he says. “The families and community leaders have been supportive as we look for ways to build a permanent program.”

A permanent program is the direction in which Coach Allan and the McCauley Community League intend to go. They are exploring opportunities for the program to continue indoors through the fall, winter, and early spring.

Coach Allan and the MCL Board extend their gratitude to all the parent volunteers who have helped make the McCauley summer soccer program a success.

Alice is the President of the McCauley Community League Board.
Mark is the Program Manager for REACH Edmonton’s Neighbourhood Organizing Initiative.

Be Kind and Be Proud

_“We don’t even know how strong we are until we are forced to bring that hidden strength forward. In times of tragedy, of war, of necessity, people do amazing things. The human capacity for survival and renewal is awesome.”- Isabel Allende (Chilean writer) _

The most serious pandemic in the last 100 years in Canada has been a topic of discussion since the first Canadian case of COVID-19 was recorded on January 25th, 2020 in Toronto.

Here we are, over a year later, and we are still learning. As regulations lift and many closed businesses are re-opening, we still should ease back at our own pace and be understanding of others. If you still want to follow the protocols, that is fine.
What I noticed throughout this time was the strength and kindness of many in the community, from offers of rides to vaccination centres to assistance with deliveries. The contributions of neighbours helping any way they can for those who need assistance makes me feel proud and secure.

Everybody contributes in their own way. A simple hello can make a difference in one’s day! I have witnessed many acts of kindness. This is a very diverse community, but our common bond is support.

A good source for information is:
https://www.canada.ca/en/public-health/services/diseases/coronavirus-disease-covid-19.html
Be proud, neighbours – I sure am.

Ian is a columnist with the paper. He lives in the area.

A Visitor’s “Interesting” Summer in McCauley

When I asked my old college roommate if she had a room for me for the summer, I never thought I’d be signing up for one of the most interesting summers of my life!

There is a lot to love in McCauley – friendly front-porch culture, magnificent trees, great access to transit (I put a lot of miles on my monthly bus passes), national and ethnic diversity, kindness towards those in need, the Italian Centre and Caboto Park, proximity to restaurants of world cuisines, passionately loyal long-term residents, and committed and engaged citizenry. I – a white woman in my late 60s – felt personally very safe. It’s a great neighbourhood.

And then there’s the other side of “interesting.” My arrival in late April coincided with the widely noted spike in the opioid crisis, and our house was in the thick of it. Almost immediately, while I was enjoying a coffee or beer on the lovely veranda, it became obvious that one house was generating an unusual amount of foot traffic and that in our area there was a disproportionate number of overdoses and attendant EMS calls (and garbage). Neighbours across two blocks connected and started to act. Over the next weeks we kept track of numbers, setting up an “incident reporting” spreadsheet on Google Drive. With so much drug use happening on our block, we inevitably had to call in suspected overdoses. When we did, we had conversations with EMS, fire folk, and police about the broader opioid issues facing our community. Anytime anything went down, we knew about it and shared the information.

My neighbours also developed a plan to contact the services which could address problems. Collectively we liaised regularly with EPS, especially McCauley’s “beat cops.” We also kept Mark Davis (REACH Edmonton), the Revitalization Committee, the Community League, and the Problem Properties Initiative in the loop. We contacted our City Councillor, met with our MLA, and filed many 311 complaints and reports with SCAN.

We came together, coordinated our efforts, and saw great success. In early August the main problem house was shut down – emptied, boarded up. Though the process took time because service providers and civic/provincial authorities are bound by laws and procedures, it was worth it.

My lessons learned:

  • Help the authorities with concrete information – keep a written record of dates/times/incidents.
  • Thank them for their services when you can – they’re people doing their best.
  • Talk to your neighbours – there is strength in numbers.
  • Be patient – let the legal process evolve but stay in touch with the enforcers.
  • And, be VERY determined.

Thanks, McCauley, for a really great summer!

Important contact information if YOU have a problem property to report:

  • Mark Davis, Program Manager for REACH Edmonton’s Neighbourhood Organizing Initiative: mark.davis@reachedmonton.ca.
  • SCAN: Safer Communities and Neighbourhoods: 1-866-960-SCAN (7226). There’s also a reporting form on the web.
  • The City’s 311 number is also an option, though they have been very busy this summer!

Hermina Joldersma is a retired academic currently living in Yellowknife pursuing fibre art and other adventures in Canada’s North. She’s always had a soft spot for Edmonton generally and McCauley specifically.

Remembering Betty Nordin

February 8th, 1946 - August 14th, 2021

Betty Nordin. File Photo

When Betty Nordin wrote the words of her poem “Nobody sees her” in 2002, she was sharing her own painful experiences and calling for readers to pay more attention to the lives and dangers of women trying to survive homelessness and life on the streets. It was a deeply personal sharing, like each of the poems she wrote.

She had no idea it would be handed out on the street in Vancouver during the Picton murder trials or shared even further by Amnesty International. She had no idea her moving poetry would lead to her being honoured with an Esquao Award. She just knew too many women, who could have been her, had died or been profoundly damaged, and no one had noticed or cared.

Betty Nordin died in August at the age of 75, after many years of poor health. She was laid to rest in a green burial, as she chose, a dream catcher made of elk points that she created tucked in the shroud with her. After smudging with sweetgrass, those gathered at the grave listened to “Women’s warrior song” by Sawt Martina Pierre, sung as she was buried. But for those who knew her over her years living in Boyle Street and McCauley she will be remembered for her hard work on behalf of murdered and missing women, a strong supporter of the Prostitution Action and Awareness Foundation of Edmonton (now CEASE) in its work to end sexual exploitation, and as a vendor for the Our Voice street newspaper, on the street in every sort of weather with a welcoming smile for each one who passed by.

Even when poor health confined her to her apartment she still cared for others. Each year in November she would have a box set up in the building’s lobby and ask all the residents of the facility to donate socks to go to Bissell Centre for giving to those in need.

During her life, she had four collections of poetry published, She believed she was led to writing by God and that it was a path for her from the life of struggle on the streets to a new stability and peace, although she had to work hard to find that new life. At her funeral service one of her poems was read, with some lines that say, “My life is like a Phoenix/ Hope which rose from the ashes/ of loneliness and despair, anger and frustration/ . . . But today this is all behind me/ . . . For I have/ risen like a Phoenix from the ashes.”

Jim works with Inner City Pastoral Ministry and is a former Boyle McCauley News board member.

A New Face in an Old Space

Shrimp on eggplant with green peppers. Alan Schietzsch

China Marble Restaurant
10566 97 Street NW
780-760-2808

With our local Chinatown losing the long-beloved Pagolac Restaurant – remember the “7 Courses of Beef”? – our community has experienced a bit of a foodie hole. Missing the comfort of that delicious (if a little well-worn) eatery, I’d often wondered if something would come along to fill the hole.

Good news! I recently noticed that the exterior had been repainted with spectacular red, yellow, and green multi-coloured bricks, and a bright red sign put up to announce the new home of China Marble Restaurant. It was time to make a dinner date and check out the new place.

The exterior isn’t the only thing that is all spruced up. While being seated, we could see that care was taken to make the interior experience lovely too. The space seemed both comfortably familiar and yet new, with freshly painted green trim, tiled floor, and traditional Chinese decor on the walls. Tables and chairs were all decked out with elegant golden covers, all the better to set the stage in hopeful anticipation of food that’s been prepared with as much care as the setting.

The cheerful server let us know that there were two different menus. China Marble offers a Westernized “Chinese” menu for eat-in or fast-food take-out, and for the real thing, their proper Chinese menu has an extensive three-page list, with dozens of different hot pots, fried and Chow Fan noodles, rice dishes, seafoods, meats, soups, Lo Meins, vegetables, and congees, as well as a “Chef Choice” section.

The “real” Chinese menu looked fascinating, and with such variety, we wanted to find out what the “Chef Choice” category had to offer. For a new experience, we chose the China Marble Bitter Melon Chicken as our first item. Bitter melon was an unfamiliar taste, so we were intrigued to find out that this was more of a vegetable than what we typically thought of as “melon.” It has a deep, earthy flavour with the bitterness being reminiscent of broccoli, kale, or endive, and it paired well with the stir-fried veggies and sauce.

We also wanted to try the seafood, so our next and equally large dish to arrive was shrimp on eggplant with green peppers. We could hear it as soon as it left the kitchen, presented on a sizzling-hot cast iron platter. A mouth-watering aroma rose up from the bubbling sauce, promising gentle sweetness, saltiness, and super-moist shrimp for which I will definitely be back.

Both the dishes had portion sizes that were very generous, and it was clear that China Marble’s dishes are sized for sharing among several diners. This would be a great spot for work groups or family-and-friends gatherings, and there was plenty of room in two sections to arrange tables for convenient seating, as well as tables for couples or singles.

To complement all of the protein and veggies, we ordered a bowl of steamed rice, which my partner thought was slightly firmer than she liked. I didn’t mind that and thought perhaps it was done that way so that it can go into soup or soak up flavourful sauces.

We also wanted to try the drinks, so I ordered a Hong Kong Milk Tea, while my partner enjoyed sipping the traditional Chinese tea. These were a perfect dessert after the substantial feast, with so much food that we were able to take home the rest for a tasty lunch the next day.

Service was pleasant and attentive, with genuine interest in the customers’ enjoyment of the food, and without being intrusive. The staff know what they’re doing. A chat revealed that China Marble started on the south side, and that the new 97th Street location was staffed by very experienced chefs.

With such an extensive Western Chinese and real Chinese menu, and being able to accommodate all sizes of groups, China Marble provides something for everyone. We’ll definitely be back, for both the comfort food and when we want to try something new, or when we have a large group. It’s great to have a new spot in the neighbourhood.

Alan lives in McCauley. He is the Chair of the paper’s Board of Directors.

Sadness Past and Present

Searching for Hope Through Gardens and Memorials.

Betty Nordin (front right), Kathy King (second from left), and others at the blessing of the Memorial Garden in 2004. Kate Werkmann

I learned about the passing of Betty Nordin several days after the CEASE Annual August Memorial. This year, for the first time since the first Memorial was held August 14th, 2000, we had to move the date to August 17th. The Community Garden and Hall generously provided by the Alberta Avenue Community Centre were not available on the 14th. Betty died on August 14th. Somehow, it seems fitting that this year, the 14th was a day to remember her alone.

Betty attended the memorials in the early 2000s. In 2003, she proposed to CEASE (then known as PAAFE) that we should create a garden in memory of the women who were murdered and missing. The horrific news of the women murdered by Picton in B.C., coupled with the number of women disappearing from Edmonton streets, was heavy on our minds.

We approached e4c and were welcomed by then CEO Martin Garber-Conrad to create the Memorial Garden on the Alex Taylor Grounds. In 2004, Ken Bregenser and his team from Zocalo designed the garden. We gathered there for many years, until one year the hall wasn’t available on August 14th. Alberta Avenue welcomed us to gather in their community garden space and the Annual Memorial has been held there ever since. The folks at e4c continue to tend the little garden at the Alex Taylor site.

Each year, the names of those whose lives were lost to murder, suicide, overdose, or illness are read. Prayers, poems, and honour songs are offered. The common thread is sexual exploitation and trauma. The number of lives lost to murder has declined – thankfully – but the number of lives lost to overdose and illness has increased.

In July, several women dropped into the CEASE office, feeling trapped in the net of opioid use disorder. Our team feels as helpless as they do. There are death-dealing drugs, theft, and threats from others in the street life, and few safe spaces to rest or to live. Who would rent to a person active in opioid use? Residents in Boyle Street and McCauley are all too familiar with seeing people hunched over, lying down, or suffering other drug-induced reactions. Many calls are made to 911 and 211. Neighbours of drug houses live in fear. It feels overwhelming.

It’s true, there are now more detox beds at Spady and Poundmaker’s. There is easier access to naloxone kits, and soon nasal spray kits will be available at more sites. There are street outreach teams working to reach people and prevent deaths. There are frequent headlines calling for more strategic and coordinated action on the opioid crisis as the deaths mount.

In the meantime, we can offer kindness, water on a hot day, and naloxone kits. We can gather at annual memorials, remember and honour lives lost, and continue to advocate for short-term responses and long-term solutions.

I wonder what poem Betty would write now?

Kate is the Executive Director of the Centre to End All Sexual Exploitation (CEASE).

On the Edge Coffee

Another community-oriented business enriches Boyle Street.

Jodine Chase (right) with son Morgan Chase. Leanne Koziak

If you are a regular customer at On the Edge Coffee in the Edmonton Downtown Farmers Market, you will quickly get to know Jodine Chase. She is the cheerful and lively “ambassador” of this family-owned and socially conscious business.

Over the years Chase and her husband Rob McLauchlin (along with several adult children) found themselves regularly talking about opening a coffee shop. Chase, whose career for decades has been public relations and communications, was surprised to find that she was really interested in making this pipe dream a reality.

The first catalyst occurred when Chase, who is of Icelandic origin, and members of her family began taking trips to Iceland, the “homeland.” On their visits, they noticed that a prominent cultural quality (one the Chase-McLauchlin family already had) was a habit of constantly serving coffee. More often than not, the coffee was an essential element of any gathering for visiting and chat.

But each time the coffee business idea came up, it was put aside. Some of Chase’s children had worked in restaurants, so they were well aware of the enormous effort such a venture would involve. Getting up at 5 a.m. comes to mind, along with many other such taxing activities.

Then the Edmonton Downtown Farmers Market opened on 97th Street “We contacted the market,” Chase says, “and asked some questions about costs.”

Chase’s family went ahead with the coffee kiosk at the market, but then the pandemic threw them for a loop. “We had to pivot so many times in so many ways,” Chase says. “We were dizzy.”

New ideas kept surfacing. The family Airstream trailer was put into service on Saturdays when the market bloomed outdoors during the summer. The trailer has also been showing up this summer at various outdoor events.

On the Edge will soon be roasting its own coffee on site at the market. “New technology allows us to have an electric roaster with zero emissions,” Chase says.

The company’s website, ontheedgecoffee.ca, states, “We believe coffee is one of life’s necessities. Brewing and selling coffee is a natural extension of our passion for the beverage and its ability to bring people together . . . We work with roasters who source beans ethically and pay farmers enough to help them earn a decent living.”

The Boyle Street community continues to grow and thrive. True, the movement often seems excruciatingly slow. But things are happening. On the Edge Coffee is a part of this.

Anita Jenkins is a retired writer and editor who lives in Boyle Street.

The Children’s Garden: Dreams Fulfilled

Saying goodbye to a place that brought the community together.

The colourful fence of the Children’s Garden. Paula E. Kirman  

The closing year of the Children’s Garden is bittersweet. The property will be redeveloped with new housing, which is important revitalization for a neighbourhood that often has good houses torn down while empty lots and dilapidated houses sit empty or underused. For my daughter and me the garden has been a lovely and cheerful destination in the neighbourhood. For many more folks it has been a place of safety and rest.

For the past few years my daughter and I have cycled to the garden to rest and read on the tree plank bench my partner created and placed there from a large Manitoba maple that had been in our front boulevard – a lovely reuse. For me, this is a time to ponder my past experiences of McCauley, and for my daughter it is an opportunity to find herself at home here in the present. I love the creative childhood I have been able to give her to create such beauty and take care of a space that is not necessarily ours but is better because of us – a playful place that is free to everyone and not necessarily mediated or mandated by an organization or specific way to be within it.

The garden beds at 107A Avenue and 92nd Street were dreamed up in 2018 as a creative community project on an empty city lot previously owned by the parents of longtime resident Lily Mounma. Lily had recently sold Viphalay, a Thai restaurant that still thrives now as Noi, operated by Lily’s uncle, in the heart of the city at 107A Avenue and 95th Street. Back then Lily wanted another project she was passionate about: giving children opportunities they might not regularly have and creating a stronger community as a whole. She created a garden because her daughter loves gardening and because she realized that there needed to be more beauty within our neighbourhood. It became a safe place we could go to and connect with our community.

Lily wanted it to be a natural gathering space since McCauley doesn’t have a community school to which all our children go. She wanted to honour the need for a place we could go and get to know each other. She also loved the idea of gardens: how you plant a seed and it can grow within weeks, giving our children the sense of the cycle between hard work and fruition of a plan. The garden space has depended on us doing the work and showing up the best we could in the moments we had for it to grow. This is an idea that is both empowering and magical.

During this past year of Covidian times the garden became even more important as a close and safe way to gather in community and with friends. It was an activity to help regulate our weeks when many previous schedules had disappeared and we had to build new ones. It was great to be somewhere where others were going through similar feelings and to share in tasks towards a common gentle goal, which meant mostly for the mothers to garden while children played together in the green space. The painted fence boards that circle the city lot come from an art project at a previous community garden in McCauley on 95th Street and will hopefully live on in future gardening opportunities. I am looking forward to the fall harvest and the Halloween festival for more sweet community happenings.

Ruth lives in McCauley with her partner and daughter.

Turning Things Around

It is a beautiful mid-August afternoon and I am sitting inside writing down my thoughts. Things are supposedly getting back to normal. I have actually socialized with people in person for the first time in a year and a half.

But how “normal” things will continue to be remains to be seen. The effects of the last while are still resonating. A very concrete example is the very newspaper you are holding in your hands (or reading on your screen). Pandemic restrictions, while important and necessary for our health and safety, have decimated the non-profit sector. We should have had a casino in the spring, but it has been delayed.

As a result, we have had to reduce the number of print issues we publish, and if things don’t turn around soon, may have to stop publishing altogether. This would be a devastating blow to the community. For some, the print edition of the paper is a lifeline, a way to stay connected.

Others here in McCauley and Boyle Street have dedicated years, and in some cases, decades to the paper. Long-term friendships have been forged through the connections made by volunteering.

Until things turn around for Boyle McCauley News, asking for help is going be a regular thing. The quickest, easiest way to help is to take part in our Toss Us Your Toonies campaign. More details are here: bmcnews.org/donate. More information on how to support the paper is on page four.

Boyle McCauley News has been around for 42 years. Together, we can make sure it’s still around for its next milestone birthday.

October 2021

We’re back – for now. Our financial situation is still not looking good. At the time of writing, it is looking like our casino won’t happen until the first quarter of 2023.

As a result, our publishing schedule now looks a little different. During our current fiscal year (which began on September 1st and ends August 31, 2022), we will be publishing only six issues, including the one you are currently reading. We will publish again on December 1st. In 2022, we have issues scheduled for February 1st, April 1st, June 1st, and August 1st. We will reevaluate our situation next summer to determine what the 2022/2023 fiscal year will look like.

You can help. Our “Toss Us Your Toonies” micro-donation campaign allows you to donate as little as $2 monthly. Head to bmcnews.org/donate for more information.

Updates to our website and social media are as frequent as ever. Please follow us, like our posts, and share our content. We’re bmcnews on "Facebook":https://www.facebook.com/bmcnews and "Twitter":https://www.twitter.com/bmcnews, and bmcviews on Instagram. We also have an e-newsletter that highlights new print and web content. You can sign up on our website: bmcnews.org

Thank you for your continued support, whether financial, as a volunteer, or simply well wishes.

Passing the Torch

A fond farewell to our McCauley home.

From left: Nella Bruni, Darcia Parada, Boris Derow, Sarah Noelle Pearson, and Sarah’s daughter Olive. Leanne Koziak

In mid-July, we filled a U-Haul truck with our (too many) possessions and drove across the Canadian plains and shield to our new destination.

It was fitting that our journey’s pit stops were accompanied by sights and sounds of the strangest summer Olympics on record. The drive around the lakes is Olympian in scope.

Why did we move to New York, North America’s early epicentre of the pandemic, one might ask?

Our answer: we can idly stand by, or continue to move in the direction of our dreams set in motion pre- Covid.

While the fifteen-plus years spent in McCauley were beyond enjoyable, the last year in the dwelling affectionately dubbed Casa Rosso had been the most fulfilling and magical of all.

Covid provided an opportunity to transform. An average duckling of a house became a beautiful swan. We lost dark chocolate lab Koco and found white chocolate Abby. Our adult son moved in with us after a break up and it deepened our relationship. We started a jazz band and performed a series of backyard shows. These culminated in a farewell concert attended by Casa Rosso denizens past, present, and future.

When we decided to sell we said, “We want the house to go to people who will appreciate it and value its charm.” Enter Sarah and her artistic daughter Olive who felt the juju. Captivated, they understood the quirkiness and challenges of being new pioneers of McCauley’s chrysalis.

When I first moved back to Edmonton from New York City, I knew I wanted to reside where I would feel at home, and McCauley was it. Chinatown and Little Italy side by side – just like Manhattan – with ringing church bells, Giovanni Caboto Park, great shops, walkability, and a diverse community. We made friends here who we know we’ll miss and remember fondly. The neighbourhood we called home will always remain in our hearts and memories. We also know that in passing the torch to Sarah and Olive, the love on the block will increase in Olympian fashion.

Darcia Parada, writing from Brooklyn, New York.

How to Support Boyle McCauley News

No donation is too small. It all adds up and helps us towards our goal of financial sustainability. However, if you are in a position to contribute a substantial amount, here are some numbers to guide you. These estimates are calculated for a 12 page issue.

  • The TOTAL cost of one issue: $4275 (This includes printing, editing, volunteer coordination, layout/design, distribution, and bookkeeping.)
  • The cost of PRINTING one issue: $1100
  • 10% of the cost of one issue: $427.50
  • 10% of the cost of PRINTING one issue: $110
  • Communications (Internet, telephone) annually: $1500

How to Donate

Online
You can donate online via PayPal at our website:
https://bmcnews.org/donate
Your donation can be one-time, or you can set up a monthly donation schedule.

Interac E-Transfer
Send an e-transfer to accounting@bmcnews.org, and put “BMC News Donation” in the “message” field.

Cheque
Send your cheque, made payable to “Boyle McCauley News” to:
9613 111 Avenue NW
Edmonton, AB T5G 0A9

Please note that we cannot provide income tax receipts for donations.

What is Boyle McCauley News?

The goals of the paper include:

  • To be a vehicle, through which community organizations can inform local residents of their services and activities, providing opportunities to be involved in the neighbourhood.
  • To be a voice for residents who wish to express their concerns, interests, and ideas.
  • To report on local issues and events in the community or are of community interest.
  • To work cooperatively with the local businesses regarding advertising services and points of interest.
  • To be a community-based newspaper that strives towards financial self-sufficiency and which functions through the use of volunteers.

Your Community Newspaper Urgently Needs Your Support

A Message to Readers, Community Members, and Potential Donors and Sponsors.

Boyle McCauley News’ Editor Paula Kirman (left) and Volunteer Coordinator Colleen Chapman at Resource Connect (organized by REACH Edmonton) in 2019. File Photo

P(DROPCAP). The pandemic has had a negative effect on many non-profit organizations – and that includes Boyle McCauley News.

Much of the hardship stems from the closure of casinos (70% of our annual budget) during the pandemic. We were supposed to have ours in the second quarter of 2021, but the backlog is about a year and a half long, which means we may not get a casino until the first quarter of 2023. We also missed a year of community festivals where we raised money by doing things such as selling raffle tickets.

We already had to shut down the print edition for the summer. During our current fiscal year (which goes from September 1 to August 31), we have enough budgeted for six print editions. However, unless things turn around in the near future, we are on the brink of shutting down forever. We risk losing this 42-year-old newspaper, which has been published regularly since 1979. Each issue has 5,000 print copies distributed, along with 3,000 to 5,000 visitors monthly online at our website.

Boyle McCauley News connects our unique inner city community. It is the only place where you can find many of these stories about what is happening in your neighbourhood that are not covered by regular media.

As the Chair of Boyle McCauley News, I am amazed by the hard work and dedication of the staff and volunteers. They write, photograph, edit, design, proofread, assemble, and deliver each issue and maintain the website. They manage the budget and keep financial records. They find ways to thank the volunteers and raise funds.

Please consider donating, sponsoring, or supporting us in any way you can to ensure that this great work continues. And, if you know of individuals or groups who would like to support our efforts, please encourage them to help. Details of how you can contact us and/or assist us financially are linked below.

I am confident that this unique community can do this! We have a stellar record of volunteerism and support for each other.

Alan Schietzsch
Boyle McCauley News Board Chair

TO FIND OUT HOW TO SUPPORT BOYLE MCCAULEY NEWS, CLICK HERE.

Remembering Barbara Ann Johnson

Music and a display at Barbara Ann Johnson’s funeral on July 17th. Ann-Marie Johnson

Barbara Ann Johnson, a longtime community member, passed away on July 12th. Her funeral took place on July 17th in Giovanni Caboto Park. Over 50 people came out to honour Barb.

Condolences from all of us at Boyle McCauley News go out to Barb’s daughter, Ann-Marie Johnson. Ann-Marie is one of our volunteer block carriers.

Isabel is Doing Well

Mystery novel by Boyle Street’s Candas Jane Dorsey is making waves in the literary world.

The cover of the British edition of The Adventures of Isabel. Supplied

In our January 2021 edition we featured Candas Jane Dorsey’s novel, The Adventures of Isabel, which was published by ECW Press on October 20th, 2020: New Novel from Candas Jane Dorsey Influenced by Boyle Street

Since then, the novel has been making waves in the literary world and is being published in other countries. In addition to rave reviews, the British edition will be published soon. As well, the rights have been sold to a publisher in Germany, and there is an audio book from Orange Sky.

Here is a just a partial list of print and online appearances that Boyle Street’s Candas Jane Dorsey has made over the past while concerning The Adventures of Isabel:

I Was A Summer Student With Inner City Rec and Wellness

Experiencing the inner city creates a new perspective.

Yumna painting the sidewalk outside of the Boyle Street Community Centre. Mike Siek

When I got the job to be a summer student with the Inner City Recreation and Wellness Program with Boyle Street Community Services, I was unsure what to expect. I have always wanted to help my community and be even a small part in helping those around me. I witnessed a significant amount of trauma growing up, and the idea that I would be a person who just sits on the side lines has never been acceptable to me. That being said, I also come from a place of privilege. Growing up I have never had to worry about money, addiction was not something I witnessed in my life, and life was relatively stable. I worried that I would be too much of an outsider, unable to connect to the world I was entering. Frankly, I come from a world that teaches me to be scared of what I don’t know, and to turn the other way and not bother.

What I’ve learned from coming to Boyle Street and gaining first-hand experience is that even though I’ve resisted these notions, they have still affected how I act and see the world. I have been trained to think the inner city is a scary place. Instead, what I have witnessed is a vibrant, rich community. What has been described as “run down” has a mural at every corner, art centres such as iHuman, and CO*LAB. There is a helping hand everywhere I turn, whether at Boyle, Bissell, or anywhere else. When I drive to work the skyscrapers I once loved loom behind me, feeling colder and disconnected, quickly replaced by the warmth in the inner city.

While growing up we never talked about the centres that are there to help people. We only ever talked about the struggle and devastation, not the amount of programs dedicated to helping with housing, bringing back ceremonies to Indigenous peoples, and providing recreational programs to strengthen our community. They go almost as fully under the radar as the people in need of their services, and it’s sad how little I knew before coming here.

Boyle Street is a community like I have never seen. It is making space for people to be heard. Every time I have a painting session at the Boyle Street Community Centre, help at the pet food bank, or take a trip to the Lady Flower Gardens, I hear a new story and make a new friend. People here are truly paying attention to those around them. Where I come from you avoid the person sleeping in the corner. Here, everyone stops to make sure they are breathing and looked after. I have gained so much from being here and am honoured to be taking part at all.

That is not to discredit the difficulties of everyday life that I witness. There is so much struggle and never enough help. I have watched many singular people do the work of ten, trying to help anywhere they can. Despite that, I have never been treated better in my workplace in my life. I have received more calm and patience trying to help someone get housing than I have received from customers in fitting rooms while working retail. I have had more discussions about mental health and self-prioritizing here than at any of those previous retail jobs. It seems odd to me that at a job that is essential for other people’s survival, where I could most rationally be worked the hardest, I have been met with more understanding and compassion than at the capitalist corporations I have worked at.

In short, here in the inner city I have witnessed a lot of sad and devastating things. However, I have also witnessed more compassion, friendship, community, patience, and understanding than anywhere else in my life. I feel really lucky to be a part of it.

Yumna “Moose” Moussa, age 25, was a summer student with Boyle Street’s Inner City Recreation and Wellness Program. They are currently a Child and Youth Care student at Norquest College.

Artists in the Fallow Exhibit at Brighton Block

Artists in the Fallow exhibit poster Supplied

Artists in the Fallow Group Exhibition and Artist Residency Kick-Off

Soft Opening: July 22nd 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Opening reception and Artist Salon: July 24th 12:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Artist Salons: July 31st and Aug 7th 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.
Friday Patios: July 30th and Aug. 6th 5:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.

Join us Thursday, July 22 5 p.m. -8 p.m. for the opening of the Artists in the Fallow exhibition. This exhibition serves as the beginning of artist-led DIY exhibitions taking over un-leased/currently vacant or unused spaces in Amiskwacîwâskahikan/Edmonton with the aim to highlight artists at all stages in their careers.

This group exhibition showcases over 25 Edmonton artists, including members of Nina Haggerty Centre for the Arts and iHuman Youth Society, as well as the Mile Zero dance company. In addition to the opening event, there will be future events such as artists talks and panels with the featured artists.

Artists in the Fallow was formed to provide a space for artists who haven’t been able to show throughout the pandemic and be an opportunity to re-enter the art scene, and to provide a space to create work. We are interested in providing exhibition space to emerging artists, collectives, and community organizers.

We are open July 22, 24, 30, 31 and August 6 & 7. Stay tuned to our Instagram @artistsinthe for future events and programming.

Special thanks goes out to Primavera Development group for the donation of the building to exhibit in!

Safer McCauley Summer Update

Who to Call postcard - front. Supplied

MCCAULEY DOG WALKABOUT
THURSDAY, JULY 22 @ 7 P.M. (arrive 10 minutes early!):

We’re very happy to resume the monthly McCauley Dog Walkabout! Join your neighbours for a 30-minute “pack walk” on Thursday July 22 @ 7 p.m. (arrive by 6:50!). Meet at Giovanni Caboto Park fountain. Be a presence on the streets, meet new friends, get some exercise, and explore a different part of our neighbourhood every month. All are welcome. And dogs are optional!

MCCAULEY & CHINATOWN WHO TO CALL POSTCARD

A new Who to Call postcard is being distributed in McCauley. A digital copy is included in this update. It contains information about how to confidentially report a problem property, contact your McCauley and Chinatown EPS Beat officers, request free clean up of illegally dumped junk and discarded needles, and request free Litter Kits and sharps containers. The postcard has been translated into Traditional Chinese for distribution in the Chinatown BIA. To access and download the more comprehensive Chinatown and McCauley Safety & Cleanliness Booklet, please click on the following link: http://safermccauley.ca/resources/.

MCCAULEY NEIGHBOURHOOD-BUILDING & ENGAGEMENT SURVEY

The McCauley Community League and its partners would like to know how you want to engage with your community. There are many opportunities for all neighbours to participate in an inclusive, thriving McCauley! Using the results of the survey, the community league will work with partners like Safer McCauley and McCauley Revitalization to connect neighbours to volunteer opportunities. Please click on the following link by July 31 to fill out the easy McCauley Neighbourhood-Building and Engagement Survey. You will be entered in a draw for a $50 gift card to a McCauley restaurant: https://forms.gle/1RfFYcjWmWXhfvir6.

“You Look Good For Your Age”

Anthology features essay by Boyle McCauley News’ Editor

Cover of “You Look Good For Your Age” Supplied

Paula E. Kirman, editor of Boyle McCauley News, is one of the 29 contributors to a new anthology, You Look Good for Your Age (edited by Rona Altrows; published by the University of Alberta Press, 2021). As well, at the online book launch on May 27th, Paula was one of the writers selected to read from her works.

In the book, the writers (all of whom are women) share their distinct opinions, impressions, and speculations on aging and ageism and their own growth as people. Paula is one of the younger women included in the anthology. Yet, she says, because she is in her mid-40s, she finds she is what she describes as “caught in the middle” and being on “the dividing line.”

Paula’s essay, “Adult Tween,” is about feeling happy to be taken for younger than your age (“the joy of being ID’ed”), along with being called “Ma’am” for the first time, having your hair turn grey, and more. Here is a video of Paula reading from her essay.

You Look Good Your For Age is available at Audrey’s Books and Glass Bookshop.

A Place of Love: Historic Landmark Becoming Transitional Housing for Women

Stovel Block. Leif Gregersen

A heritage building in the Boyle Street area is being converted into transitional housing for people who identity as women, and who are struggling with poverty and lack of housing.

The Stovel Block at 10327 97th Street was built in the early 1900s. In 2019 it became a designated historic site by the City of Edmonton. In early March, it was purchased by the real estate firm Gather Co., which signed a lease with Boyle Street Community Services to repurpose the building into this new housing initiative.

The City of Edmonton has provided $645,000 in grant funding to go towards the rehabilitation of the building’s historical elements. The full restoration was covered by Gather Co, at a cost of around $1,356,000.

Elder Rose Wabasca led a pipe and smudging ceremony in March, and afterwards gave Stovel Block a Cree name: Sakhita Kikinaw, which roughly translates to a house or place of love.

The building has 30 individual suites and a common kitchen space. The women residing in the building will transition to long-term housing.

McCauley Community League Summer Update

Giovanni Caboto Park Paula E. Kirman

Greetings neighbours!

The 2021 McCauley Community League Annual General Meeting was held virtually on Wednesday, June 16. Many thanks to the 23 community members and five guests (a.k.a. “friends of McCauley”) who attended! It was a positive meeting, full of meaningful dialogue, good questions and productive conversations.

At this meeting, we bid a fond farewell to Adam Snider, who completed a two-year term on the Board. Adam’s level-headedness and prevailing sense of calm have been wonderful assets to our Board. Many thanks to Adam and Adam’s family for his time and commitment!

We are also thrilled to welcome three new Board members: Rickard Enstroem, Regan Gee, and Todd Janes. You can read more about the people on your eight-member Board in the bios accompanying this article.

AND – while she wasn’t quite ready to announce it at the AGM, our warmest congrats to Jordynn Vis who is pregnant with her second child! Jordynn has decided to take a break from the Board come fall. Over the next few months, she will be transitioning her presidential duties to new League president Alice Kos.

Jordynn has quietly and diligently accomplished a great deal for McCauley in her (approximately) one year as Board President, despite all the roadblocks presented by a global pandemic. We are particularly grateful for her behind-the-scenes work in modernizing Board processes, centralizing data, and streamlining operations. We are deeply grateful for Jordynn’s work, and wish her and her growing family the very best!

The McCauley Community League Board typically takes a summer break from its regular monthly meetings. However, at the brief meeting that immediately followed the AGM, our new Board agreed that we’d like to ride the positive momentum happening within our group and among community partners and neighbours. As such, we’ll continue meeting throughout the summer (meeting dates: Tues. July 6 at 7:30 p.m.; Tues. Aug 10 at 7:30 p.m.). We want to remind everyone that our meetings are open to all! If you wish to attend any of our monthly meetings, simply email us at league@mccauleycl.com so that we can email you the Zoom link in advance.

Here are some of the things we’re currently working on:

MCCAULEY NEIGHBOURHOOD-BUILDING AND ENGAGEMENT SURVEY:

How do YOU want to engage with your community? We want to know! 

We all have different passions and different amounts of time to give. And there are many opportunities for all neighbours to participate in an inclusive, thriving McCauley!

We believe the McCauley Community League is most effective when we collaborate with community partners like McCauley Revitalization, Safer McCauley, Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues, and our City of Edmonton Neighbourhood Resource Coordinator. Using the results of this Neighbourhood-Building and Engagement Survey, we’ll work with our partners to connect neighbours to volunteer opportunities.

If you haven’t completed it yet, here’s the survey link: https://forms.gle/1RfFYcjWmWXhfvir6. Your input will help to build a database of active McCauley neighbours and support them to contribute in areas they are passionate about.

Many thanks to those of you who have already provided your input. We are gathering data and will be in touch! Those who complete the survey before July 31 will be entered to win $50 to a restaurant of your choosing in Chinatown or Little Italy! 


Your survey input can be as brief or extensive as you wish. Only 3 fields marked with an *asterisk are mandatory.

RINK BEAUTIFICATION & SUMMER ACTIVATION

Our Board is discussing how we might further activate our existing community assets. This has led to exciting dialogue around how the beloved McCauley Rink can be used throughout the year. And while we explore a variety of possibilities, we’re working on tidying up and beautifying the space.

The Board recently hired a groundskeeper to maintain the rink property for a few hours per week over the summer months: longtime McCauley resident and 10-year rink volunteer Albert Bernard. Over the past few weeks, Albert and our Board Vice President volunteer, Kevin Jones, have done a bang-up job dealing with weeds and overgrowth at the rink. Ruth Sorochan, who runs the McCauley Children’s Garden, contributed some lovely potted strawberry plants in homage to our Ward O’Day-min (Cree for “strawberry”). Together, we planted annuals in the planter along the north fence. “Something cheerful,” in Ruth’s words. Thanks to Ruth and her daughter Maia!

The League Board also intends to apply for grant funds to purchase and hang string lights along the entire rink fence perimeter, in efforts to add charm and to further promote safety and security at the rink.


Finally, we hope to partner with the McCauley Children’s Garden and McCauley Families to run art sessions wherein McCauley children and youth create painted weatherproof tiles that can be mounted on the chain link fence.

JOIN THE MCCAULEY MOVES STRAVA CLUB!


Strava is a free, web-based app on which you can log various exercises, such as walking, cycling, running, swimming, x-country skiing, and more. Strava tracks your movement using GPS. It also incorporates social media features with options to follow others and give them “kudos” on exercises they’ve logged.

We’ve started a Strava club called “McCauley Moves” and invite you to join! We are currently 13 members strong. 



Why join?

  • Connect with your neighbours by getting outside and moving your body! All movers, from leisure-level to hardcore athlete are most welcome.
  • Enjoy the myriad physical and mental health benefits that come with being active outdoors.
  • Our hope is that it may lead to (post-pandemic) groups walking, cycling, cross-country skiing etc…in person, together!

McCauley Moves is currently participating in the Edmonton Community League-based “June Bike Challenge” organized by Ritchie Community League. We are one of 27 Leagues who’ve signed up. McCauley Moves cyclists have collectively logged nearly 500 kms so far this month!

Anyone interested can sign up at https://strava.com, then download the Strava app to your smartphone. After you’ve created your profile, search for McCauley Moves under “Clubs” and click Join! You can also use this direct link: https://www.strava.com/clubs/mccauleymoves. Then, whenever you’re about to embark on an outdoor activity, open the app, hit “record” and then “start.” That’s pretty much all there is to it!

SOCCER PROGRAM


We’re delighted to announce that the McCauley Community Summer Soccer program is a go! Huge thanks to Allan Suarez who has generously volunteered to lead and coach this program.


Kids and youth will play Tuesday evenings. Game times will be 6:00 – 6:30 p.m. for the youngest kids (roughly ages 3-7) and 6:30-7:30 p.m. for kids 8 and up. Families can register by completing the form at https://www.mccauleycl.com/soccer/, or they can register in-person on the first day (Tues. July 13 from 6 – 7:30 p.m.).


We’ll also be offering all-ages, casual drop-in soccer on Sundays at 5 p.m., starting July 18. All are welcome, and there is no need to register for the Sunday games.


All games will take place at Giovanni Caboto Park, weather permitting. Please spread the word!

OTHER SUMMER PROGRAMMING YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT

Summer Green Shack at Giovanni Caboto

July 5 – August 27, Mon – Fri, 2:30 – 5:30 p.m.
Crafts, games, sports, free play

Targeted for children aged 6-12, but all are welcome

Free Play for Kids Summer Program

Free Play for Kids (previously Free Footie) is accepting registrations for their day-long summer camps which will run for 5 weeks beginning in July. Register for one week or all of them.



Their summer program will be available for FREE to families who need it most. If you are one of these families, please email: registration@freeplayforkids.com. For the families that can afford to pay, a portion of those registration fees will be used to help kids in need.



Register today by emailing registration@freeplayforkids.com or filling out the form at https://freeplayforkids.com/register

Your McCauley Community League Board would love to hear from you anytime! We invite you to reach out by emailing league@mccauleycl.com.

Have a wonderful summer!

Alice Kos is the McCauley Community League’s Board President.

Meet Your 2021-2022 McCauley Community League Board!

Alice Kos - MCL Board President Supplied

Note: Click on one of the smaller photos to see a larger photo with the person’s name and position underneath. You can then use the arrows on either side of the photos to scroll through them, carousel style.

Alice Kos
MCL Board President

I became a resident of McCauley 11 years ago, when I moved in with my now-husband (who also happens to be Mark Davis of REACH Edmonton/Safer McCauley). Having grown up in the community of Beverly, the overall vibe of the neighbourhood felt familiar to me and I quickly fell in love with many neighbourhood gems in Little Italy and Chinatown.

Mark and I have two kids – a 2.5 year-old girl and a 5 year-old boy – and my relationship with McCauley is one wherein I feel increasingly committed to stay. The strong sense of connectedness I feel with my neighbours and fellow community members has come to mean a lot to me.

I joined the MCL Board because I want to engage with the community on a deeper level. I’m interested in helping to strengthen community partnerships, to take action toward tangible outcomes, and to help further McCauley as the kind of community our kids love growing up in.

Jordynn Vis
MCL Board Past President

I’ve lived in McCauley for just over five years. We love the mature neighbourhood, and being just a quick 20 min walk from downtown is really a treat. Prior to the pandemic, we would walk on Saturday mornings to our favourite breakfast spot on Jasper Avenue. You don’t get to do that in many of Edmonton’s neighbourhoods.

I first got involved with McCauley events during the community garage sale. I realized I wanted to do more. I joined the MCL Board because I wanted to advocate for my block, and joining my community league was the first step. I’m looking forward to working closely with others in the community and to making a difference.

I am a kitchen designer and love all things kitchen stylings, home organization, and tiny space planning.

Kevin Jones
MCL Board Vice President

I moved to McCauley as a first-time homeowner in 2005, drawn to the area by the large elm trees that line the streets of 1900s-era homes.

I grew up in a small Northern Ontario town playing ball hockey, sledding at a nearby park, and beating the heat at the local pond in the summer. Everyone seemed to know each other and looked after one another. Now, 30+ years later, my two daughters (Tiffany and Danica) and I enjoy playing ball hockey in the Stadium parking lot, sledding down what’s known to neighbours as “Happy Hill,” skating at our local rink, and spending time at Giovanni Caboto Park.

I’m a member of the Boilermakers Local 146 working in the oil, gas, and power plant industry. I can often be found walking my dog Roxy, rollerblading and cycling with my kids, and trying to keep our neighbourhood clean and safe by picking up litter, blowing snow off sidewalks, or watching for suspicious activities.

I’m proud to live in such a wonderful, diverse community where we can meet people from different generations and from all corners of the world. I look forward to meeting more neighbours and to helping the community stay connected, informed, and grow to its full potential.

Regan Gee
MCL Board Treasurer

Prior to joining the Board as Treasurer, I lived in McCauley on the edge of Giovanni Caboto Park for the past two-or-so years, recently having moved to my new-to-me home on 92nd Street a few months ago. Having lived in several neighbourhoods around Edmonton over the past several years, McCauley has felt most like home to me, and I’m keen to support it’s seemingly ever-changing vibe over the next while. The people, the businesses, and the pets are all pieces of the puzzle that I feel continues to draw me in and keep me around.

I have some previous experience with community-based financial management, and so feel that the role of Treasurer will suit me well. I love lunchtime wanders throughout the neighbourhood, watching the range of play and sports at the park, and swapping stories with the wide range of folks who call our neighbourhood home – be it for the day, or for the past several years.

Grace Kuipers
MCL Board Secretary

I’ve lived in McCauley since 1989 when I went to King’s College, which used to be kitty-corner to Lucky 97, which used to be a Safeway.

I moved to the south side for a year, but came back because I love the variety of culture and old neighbourhood feel about McCauley. I lived in the Inn Roads Housing Cooperative for a few years, and have been at the house on 109A Avenue since 2000.

I was the EMSA North soccer director for McCauley from 2006-2015, when our U14s won Provincials. I have been on the board on and off since about 2003. I have always been big on sports and programming in McCauley.

Currently, I would like to bring back the McCauley adult art class, which we ran for about seven years here. I work as a florist, and I love gardening and anything artistic.

Rickard Enstroem
MCL Board Director

I have lived in McCauley for only a year but have always felt enchanted by this neighbourhood, with its distinctive urban village atmosphere, walkability, prominence of independent businesses, cafes, and stores, and community-driven culture.
By joining the board, I look forward to engaging with the different community stakeholders to make our neighbourhood even better.

Todd Janes
MCL Board Director

A longtime Edmontonian, I moved to McCauley in 2008 when I bought my home. I chose McCauley because of its proximity to downtown and how walkable it is. McCauley is a fairly sustainable neighbourhood with grocery stores, shops, medical clinics, and services within 15 minutes. It also has great restaurants and food experiences. Walking from work downtown to home felt like I was in a larger and more metropolitan city, yet our neighbourhood has tree-lined streets and the feeling of a human scale, low-density community.

After many years of community involvement with local to national organizations, I decided to join the community league board because I hope to be able to help this dynamic group build some truly great assets for our community, and I really like the energy of this group. I believe in McCauley and want to work with others to build a stronger, more open, and welcoming community.

David Williamson
MCL Board Director

Our family made McCauley our home 11 years ago this spring. It’s a vibrant and colourful community which makes for a wonderful space – close to recreation facilities, transit, parks, and unique businesses.

We’re grateful to have connected with neighbours and broadened our circle of friends, and we look forward to many decades of life into the future here in our wonderful community.

Be Gentle with Seniors

Commemorating World Elder Abuse Awareness Day

I am a local senior, and I remember that when my mother was very elderly, she came to visit us. One day as I was helping her walk up a few stairs, she stumbled a bit and I grabbed her arm to keep her from falling. The next day she had quite a bruise from where I grabbed her.

A social worker came to visit us, and she asked me about the bruise on my mother’s arm. I told her about mother stumbling on the stairs, and my grabbing her arm. That moment made me realize how serious bruises are and how easily they can happen, and that made an impression on me.

Now I am a senior. As I was walking my dogs one day a couple of months ago, a cat ran by and my dogs thought it was a great game. They pulled me right off of my feet to run after the cat. I fell with a huge thud on the grass boulevard. I ended up with huge bruises on my shoulders and leg, and spent four hours at Emergency. Even a minor fall can cause serious bruising and injury to seniors. So be very careful. Even just holding the arm of a senior, we can bruise easily and the bruises can indicate serious blood loss and other health issues.

June 15th was World Elder Abuse Awareness Day.

Joanne McNeal lives in McCauley.

Heart of the City 2021 Festival Weekend Recap

Workshops shared writing, storytelling, and cultural knowledge.

Heart of the City 2021 Logo Attilo_FS

Heart of the City’s 2021 festival weekend has come and gone. It took place online on June 5th and 6th.

At The Beat Spoken Word Variety Show we laughed with comic Cindy Rivers who shared her hilarious life with us through comedy. We ached and dreamt with the poets who included Winnipeg Wallace, Meghan Ekar, Mikayla Bortscher, and K’alii Luuyaltkw. Each poet’s life and experiences were illuminated through their poetry. Thank you to our wonderful host and board member Stef Alzati for your mad emcee skills and thoughtful feedback.

We were also fed artistically by our workshop leaders Lady Vanessa Cardona, Stef Alzati, and Nisha Patel. Lady Vanessa walked us through an uplifting experience of oral storytelling. We were able to practice telling our stories and to connect with others in the community. In Stef Alzati’s labyrinth-themed poetry and meditation workshop we practiced meditation through “walking” through a hand labyrinth with our fingers and practicing meditation. We were also given lots of time to write and share poetry. Finally, in Nisha Patel’s workshop we did the work of editing a piece of poetry we had previously written under the guidance of the Poet Laureate of Edmonton! Nisha gave us very useful information on how to identify our audience and edit with them in mind.

In our first cultural sharing workshop of 2021, called `”Powwow 101,” we were hosted by Sissy Thiessen Kootenayoo online from her own home. Sissy gave us a tour of her Regalia case and showed us the amazing beadwork and seamstress work of artists in her community. Sissy showed us some footwork and explained the meaning of the dances she performs at Powwows. She filled us in on what to expect and how to prepare for a Powwow. Sissy often teaches this workshop for community organizations and those of you who missed out but really want to know about Powwow should consider hiring her to come to one of your community events to present. You can reach Sissy Thiessen Kootenayoo by visiting www.wasesabaexperiences.ca.

Finally, our Story Slam was our most successful event. We saw eight story tellers weave stories that ranged from cat fantasy, to Sci-Fi, to compelling personal stories. We had two winners: Twoey and Dr. Michael Marshall.

Seeking Community Feedback

Despite such compelling programming, we had very little online attendance in 2020 and 2021. We wonder why people didn’t take advantage of the free events we offered. It leads me, as the president of Heart of the City, to ask these questions:

  1. Are we not offering experiences that our community members want?
  2. Are our neighbours interested in supporting the arts?
  3. How can we better serve our neighbours in the future?

We would love to hear from you about what you want to see from Heart of the City in the future. Do you want artistic development workshops like our writing and oral storytelling workshops? Do you want more cultural sharing workshops?

Please email us at heartcityfest@gmail.com. You can also follow us on Twitter or our Facebook page and post your comments there! We’re @heartcityfest on both platforms.

CreArt Youth Stage Livestreams

This year we are featuring the CreArt Youth Stages live stream series! Check out the young hosts and musicians in performance and interviews every Saturday at 4 p.m. on CreArt Edmonton’s Facebook page.

Join Our Board

I want to thank the community of volunteers who have come forward to help us make this festival happen in Giovanni Caboto Park for all these years. If you love the arts and your neighbourhood and want to get more involved in community building, perhaps you will consider joining our volunteer organizing board. Our future depends on finding new board members who have an interest in learning about executing the production side of festivals. We need social media savvy board members and someone who can help with website maintenance.

If you don’t have experience, don’t worry – we work as a team! All we require is a commitment to attend board meetings and events, and passion for the arts and community building! Email us at heartcityfest@gmail.com to talk about the opportunity to join our volunteer working board.

Follow us on Twitter and Instagram: heartcityfest. Check us out and like our "Facebook page":https://www.facebook.com/heartcityfest, also heartcityfest.

Corine is the President of Heart of the City. She lives in McCauley.

McCauley Community League AGM on June 16th

Mark your calendars for our 2021 Annual General Meeting, to be held virtually on Wednesday, June 16th at 8 p.m.!

Please RSVP by emailing league@mccauleycl.com, and we’ll be sure to send you the Zoom link in advance. Become a voting member by visiting mccauleycl.com/membership. It’s free! We’ll also issue memberships at the start of the AGM.

The MCL Board is actively looking for members to fill at least three vacant spots, including the role of Treasurer. We’ve hired a third-party accountant and enrolled in Quickbooks Online, partly in efforts to ensure the Treasurer role is more manageable.

Meet your current Board here.

Many thanks and a fond ‘see-you-around!’ to Adam Snider who is nearing the end of his two-year term of service to the Board. Adam’s level-headedness and prevailing sense of calm has been a very welcome Board asset. Thanks Adam and Adam’s family!

In the coming days, we’ll be distributing a Google survey to invite McCauley residents to express their areas of interest in community volunteerism, if not as a member of the Board, then in another capacity! We aim to empower community members to volunteer in areas about which they feel passionate, and would like to build a database of neighbours who want to engage in their community. Stay tuned for the survey!

If you have any questions email league@mccauleycl.com

Panini’s Keeps the Pizzas Coming

Campaign for people to donate pizzas to Boyle Street Community Services continues.

Pizza boxes with names of donors and their locations. This photo was taken in September, 2020. Supplied

Our November 2020 issue featured a story about how Panini’s Italian Cucina was providing pizzas for lunches for the clients of Boyle Street Community Services. The pizzas were being donated by people from all over North America.

At that point, 597 pizzas were ordered – enough for 24 pizzas every week for six months. In total, 402 orders came from the United States (308 of them from Nevada), 191 from Canada (158 from Alberta), and four orders from outside Canada and the U.S.

On May 29th, Panini’s reported on its Facebook page that, as of May 31st, the restaurant has been able to deliver 837 large pizzas (that’s 6,696 slices) to Boyle Street Community Services to thus far.

“We ran two campaigns last year with the help of some Vegas Hockey fans from all over the USA, local Panini’s supporters, and a generous young man named Graeson. This coming Monday the last of those 837 pizzas will be delivered!” the post enthusiastically states.

Last year, Panini’s was exploring how to set up a website infrastructure to keep the campaign running permanently. It looks like the restaurant, which is located at 8544 Jasper Avenue, has found a solution. Check out Panini’s new website, and click DONATE A PIE.

Talent at iHuman Showcased at Nextfest 2021

Jayden Paz, one of the iHuman performers this year at Nextfest. Arsan Buffin

Nextfest was created out of the need to support the voice of the emerging professional artist, a place where the young artist was nurtured. This year’s festival is taking place online from June 3 to June 13th. The full schedule of performances is located at the festival’s website.

One of Nextfest’s showcases this year features six amazingly talented music artists from the iHuman Youth Society. Their home base is in the Boyle Street neighbourhood at 9635 102A Avenue.

Each year, iHuman Artistic Director, Steve Pirot curates a group of amazing up-and-comers to be part of our festival. This year we have an incredible lineup of newcomers and returning Nextfest alumni hitting the virtual stage.

iHuman Studios is amped to present the first season of TNT with six episodes spotlighting the iHuman music artists: Valkyrie, Vntge, Mad John, FAVES, Jayden Paz, and Trebla.

iHuman Studios is a collective of young multidisciplinary artists between the ages of 12 and 24 years who constitute the members of iHuman Youth Society. iHuman’s mission is to invite young people to transform their experiences of personal and systemic trauma through acts of expression & creativity into experiences of Purpose, Self-worth, Identity, and Belonging. Here is the schedule of episodes and artist bios.

Red Dress Day Returns to Edmonton

Red dresses line Amiskwaskahegan - Beaver Hills House Park. Paula E. Kirman

On May 5, Red Dress Day returned after an absence in 2020 due to the pandemic. An event to honour missing and murdered Indigenous people, Red Dress Day was organized by the Bear Clan Patrol Edmonton Beaver Hills House and supported by Water Warriors YEG.

Marchers gathered in Churchill Square and headed west on Jasper Avenue to Amiskwaskahegan – Beaver Hills House Park for cultural performances and to hear family members speak of their missing and murdered loved ones.

In the weeks leading up to Red Dress Day, a grassroots group of women were sewing ribbon skirts at St. Faith’s Anglicam Church to be presented to families of the missing and murdered.

One of the women, Rachel Manichoose, had previously sewed 10 skirts representing her familial line. Manichoose, who lives in the area, decided to pursue sewing skirts for families of the missing and murdered in honour of her grandmother who was murdered, and after whom she is named.

Due to COVID-19, the giving of the skirts to the families will happen at a later date.

Anti-Racism Rally Demands Justice for Pazo

An anti-racism protest was held on May 1 outside EPS headquarters. The rally was in support of Pazo, a 14-year-old Black boy who was hospitalized following an attack on school grounds by a group of other boys, and which included racial slurs hurled at Pazo. Speakers were especially taking issue over Chief McFee’s comments that the fight did not constitute a hate crime and was “consensual.” Around 100 people attended.

Photos by Paula E. Kirman

New Chinatown Safety Council

REACH Edmonton collaborates with community partners to develop strategies that make Edmonton a safer and more vibrant city. One way REACH builds capacity within neighbourhoods is by supporting local safety councils in specific geographic areas in Edmonton. One of those areas is the Chinatown Business Improvement Area (BIA), where REACH is convening and coordinating the newly formed Chinatown Safety Council.

In the summer of 2020, REACH was tasked with coordinating an effort to support Chinatown to address its safety concerns. Two large stakeholder meetings took place. Priority concerns and manageable first steps to address them were identified. REACH then proposed the creation of the Chinatown Safety Council, which began meeting regularly in February 2021.

The formation of the Chinatown Safety Council delivers on Action 1 of the 2017 Chinatown Strategy: “Develop integrated connections between social agencies, businesses, and community to advocate and collaborate to identify issues and opportunities on solutions regarding safety and security.” Council membership includes community groups (Chinatown and Area Business Association, Chinatown Transformation Collaborative, Chinese Benevolent Association, Edmonton Chinese Young Leaders Council), social agencies (Mustard Seed, Hope Mission, Boyle Street Community Services), City of Edmonton (Community Standards, Revitalization), EPS, and REACH.

The Chinatown Safety Council has had some notable early success. The business community’s relationships have been strengthened with social agencies – most notably with Hope Mission, which has the largest footprint in the BIA. Workshops are being discussed to build bridges between business owners and unhoused individuals. Translated safety resources are circulating more widely. Discussions are taking place to strengthen the community’s relationships with EPS. Dedicated safety council social media and a community events calendar are being developed. A campaign to equip businesses with motion activated lighting for back entrances is in the works. And a volunteer base is being mobilized to support safety council actions.

Poverty and services addressing poverty have concentrated in the area for years. A persistent opioid crisis, COVID-19, and anti-Asian racism exacerbate the situation. Many businesses have closed over the past year. But the community is resilient and the will to address the challenges is strong.

Chinatown faces layers of challenges. Poverty and services addressing poverty have concentrated in the area for years. A persistent opioid crisis, COVID-19, and anti-Asian racism exacerbate the situation. Many businesses have closed over the past year. But the community is resilient and the will to address the challenges is strong.

In bringing diverse stakeholders together in a collaborative and coordinated way, the Chinatown Safety Council provides some cautious optimism. It’s beyond the capacity of the council to eliminate poverty and homelessness or solve an addiction crisis. But by building cohesion and breaking larger, complex issues into manageable actions, positive things can happen.

Chinatown is a wonderful, unique, and historic asset in Edmonton. Those of us in Boyle Street and McCauley are particularly fortunate that it exists within our neighbourhoods. Whenever possible, please consider supporting its businesses.

Mark is Program Manager for REACH Edmonton’s Neighbourhood Organizing Initiative. He can be contacted at mark.davis@reachedmonton.ca.

Quarters Arts’ GLOW Was a Go

Saturday night in Boyle Street, COVID-style.

A lit GLOW sign and lantern outside of CO*LAB. Supplied by CO*LAB

On Saturday March 20, my Boyle Street neighbour Audrey Whitson and I attended the Annual Spring Equinox Light Sculpture Exhibit (GLOW). I was interested because I had previously participated in several of the Quarters Arts Society’s truly magical spring lantern parades.

But in view of COVID-19 restrictions and limitations, I was not expecting much this time around. I thought it would primarily be an opportunity to get some steps on my Fitbit by walking to and from the new CO*LAB arts space, located at 9641-102A Avenue.

I was wrong. Quarters Arts managed to produce an event that was different but still wonderful. A carefully limited audience sat around fire pits in the courtyard at the back. We were asked to stay for only 30 minutes so that others could be admitted without over-extending the COVID limits.

A line-up of performers – several musicians and a poet – entertained us from inside the building. We watched them through the open doors and on a screen in the courtyard area. Through the building’s warehouse windows, we could see restored lanterns from previous GLOW parades, along with artwork from the iHuman Youth Society. As a bonus, we admired the courtyard’s spectacular view of downtown Edmonton.

Three enormous 15-by-7-foot inflatable chickadees had been installed on the building’s roof. Unfortunately, the birds had to come down that evening because of high winds.

During our allotted time there, Audrey and I were introduced to Chubby Cree, an Indigenous hand drum group consisting of the remarkable 11-year-old vocalist, Noah Green, and his grandmother, Carol Powder. This group is receiving worldwide attention online. The performances were also streamed live and remain accessible online at colabyeg.ca.

Lorin Klask, Quarters Arts artistic director, lives in the community. She says Boyle Street has “always been full of life.” Yet, because CO*LAB was established during the pandemic, it faces many challenges.

“GLOW’s success makes me hopeful,” Klask says. “We would like to offer similar events through the spring and summer. The livestreaming component is good, but not everybody wants to watch a screen after working from home all day via Zoom and other media platforms.”

Quarters Arts, a non-profit society, engages in citizen-led projects that honour the heritage and explore the diversity of Boyle Street. For details about its community-run arts facility go to “colabyeg.ca”:https://colabyeg.ca. Follow the links to donate, volunteer, and watch the GLOW performances.

Anita Jenkins is a retired writer and editor who lives in Boyle Street.

HEART OF THE CITY FESTIVAL 2021

HOTC 2021 Logo Attilo_FS

***This feature is sponsored by Boyle McCauley News.***

Keep on Singing!

Heart of the City Festival has been bringing music and visual art to McCauley for the last 18 years. Over these years, we expanded our scope to include dance and spoken word, storytelling, poetry, and comedy. Unfortunately, for the second year in a row, we cannot meet in Giovanni Caboto Park (which is our regular haunt), but we are going to keep on singing! With the ever-changing regulations, we are working on new and innovative ways to bring you talent and art from your neighbourhood and around the city. This year we will be hosting four workshops online. We will also be presenting a Spoken Word Variety Show, where you will hear some stellar poetry and comedy! Due to the unpredictable nature of the live music scene, and because of recently expanded COVID-19 restrictions, we are not yet able to confirm what form Heart of the City Festival will take for live music. We are currently working on a strategy to bring music from the downtown core to our neighbours. Please check our website regularly for updates!
HeartCityFest.com

Heart of the City Story Slam 2021 happens on Sunday, June 6 at 4 p.m. on Zoom. What is a story slam? It is a story-telling competition. Each competitor is given 5 minutes to tell a family-friendly story in which they try to convince the judges that they deserve to win our $100 prize! Stories are judged on a 10-point scale. Who can enter? Anyone from Edmonton age 14 and up can enter this contest! There is still time to register to tell a story in our story slam. Send us an email to register at heartcityfest@gmail.com. Those of you who’d like to be in our audience can go to our website to find a Zoom join link. More info: HeartCityFest.com

Workshops

Heart of the City is dedicated to providing free workshops. This year we have a few writing workshops and a cultural sharing workshop which will be offered on Zoom. Please check our website for a complete and up-to-date list of workshops and times. HeartCityFest.com If you would like to sign up for a workshop, send us an email and we will send you more information and the join link: heartcityfest@gmail.com

*Stefani Alzati
Channeling the Inner World*

Stefani uses guided meditation to settle the mind and open a channel to the inner world. In this 2-hour workshop, we settle into ourselves, write short poetry, and share our creations together. Listen to your heart and speak your truth with poetry!

Stefani Alzati is an artist, writer, and spoken word poet from Edmonton. She incorporates somatic principles and sensory modalities into her work. She believes that poetry can heal the world. She is the readings coordinator for Parkland Poets and sits on the board of the Heart of the City Festival.

*Lady Vanessa Cardona
Oral Storytelling and Theatre*

In this workshop, led by Lady Vannessa Cardona, we will look at the importance of spoken word. We will explore why we share orally, how traditionally nations, tribes, and communities have gathered to share stories for thousands of years. We will discuss the importance of oral storytelling and how it brings people together, how stories warn us, guide us, and gives us hope.
In this workshop, we might be asked to create a whole new story together or share our stories. We might be called to create Shadow Puppet Theatre or learn other tools that can be used and learned to share our stories, tools that stimulate all or more than one sense at a time, not just the sense of hearing.

My name is Lady Vanessa, yo soy Caleña, Colombia. I am the 2018 ‘Canadian’ Individual poetry slam champion. I am a former youth mentor of “Newcomers are Lit”. I am a playwright, author, and performer of the play “Three Ladies” and co-creator of “Whiteface.” I am the Founder of Sinergia, Fiesta y Resistencia and “Remix the Ritual”- A Hip Hop theatre collective.

*Sissy Thiessen Kootenayoo
Powwow 101*

Powwow dances are practiced by First Nations People in Canada as a form of prayer, ceremony, and celebration of culture. It includes a variety of dance styles, cultural regalia, and drum songs. During this experience, participants will learn about Powwow, what it is, its importance to Indigenous People, stories of each style, and teachings of respect and integrity.

Sissy Thiessen Kootenayoo is a Treaty 6 Nakota Sioux, Cree, and German cultural facilitator, Powwow dancer, crafter/beader, spoken word poet, singer, and creative writer with ancestral roots in both Alexis Nakota Sioux Nation and Steinbach, Manitoba. Sissy has performed Powwow dance, spoken word, and song all over Edmonton, Alberta and in Montana, U.S. For more information about Sissy and her services, please visit: www.
wasesabaexperiences.ca

*Nisha Patel
Poetry Editing Workshop*

In this workshop, poets will be encouraged to treat their creations with care and ruthlessness, refining their works to serve their audiences and enabling their truest meaning and forms to emerge.

*Sunday, June 6 at 1 p.m. *
To register and receive the Zoom link please email heartcityfest@gmail.com

Nisha Patel is an award-winning queer poet and artist. She is the City of Edmonton’s Poet Laureate, and the Canadian Individual Slam Champion, as well as the 2021 Regional Writer in Residence with the Strathcona County Library. Her debut collection, COCONUT, came out April 2021 with Newest Press.

Spoken Word Variety Show

Saturday, June 5 from 7 to 9 p.m. Hosted on Zoom.
Please check our website for a link to join the Zoom call!
heartcityfest.com

In this family-friendly show on zoom, we will be joined by spoken word artists; poets, and comics. Hosted by Stefani Alzati, our comics and poets will make you laugh and possibly cry. They will entertain and challenge you. Join us for some thought-provoking poetry and a few laughs with local spoken word artists.

Poetry

Poetry can take your breath away. It can change the way you see a small detail or help you see from someone else’s vantage point. Poetry will challenge and enlighten you. It will help you feel all the feels. Expand your horizons and join us!

Featured Poets:

Winnipeg Wallace (he/him) is a spoken word artist who has twice represented Edmonton at the Canadian Festival of Spoken Word. He enjoys bulldogs, Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, and most of all, sweet beautiful poetry.

Mikayla Bortscher is a student of English and Philosophy at the University of Alberta. In her spare time, she writes poetry, plays harp, and goes running. She finds inspiration for her poetry primarily from life experience, nature, and reading non-fiction on philosophy and science. She has been published in Glass Buffalo, Grip Magazine, and the anthology Liminal Space.

We are also featuring Meghan Ekar and K’alii Luuyalkw.

Comedy

Comedy on Zoom is hard. Real hard! And it can lead to some of the most intensely funny moments, as comedians try to read the room of a bunch of blurry faces, with muted mics, staring back at them from across the Internet. It can be awkward. It can be risky. And most of all, it can make you laugh! A muted laugh is nearly indistinguishable from a painful stomach ache, so come ready to laugh till your belly hurts.

Featured Comedians:

Cindy Rivers (she/her) has performed and headlined all over Canada and even the USA. She’s performed at festivals and clubs such as, Nextfest, Big Pine Comedy Festival, Grindstone Comedy Festival, World Vibe Festival, LA Comedy Club in Las Vegas, Los Angeles Diversity In Comedy Festival by Second City, Just for laughs Northwest, and opened for the world-renowned Hannah Gadsby. She’s slightly awkward and quirky, but all funny.

Dan Taylor talks to people. He does it on comedy stages all over North America. He does it on television on CBC, CTV, YESTV, and others. He does it for corporations and universities and churches and clubs. Drawing on his experience as a husband, father, social worker, pastor, and barista, Dan’s unique background enables him to connect with a diverse audience.

We are also featuring Simon Glassman.

CreArt Youth Stage

The Youth Stage is organized primarily by youth who work with CreArt Free School of Art under the direction of Sebastian Barrera. We are excited to announce that these talented young folks will be producing live streams featuring local musicians ranging in age from 14 to 27 years old all summer! Please check the CreArt website for a schedule of events: creartedmonton.com

Featured Youth Stage Artist and Mentor:

George Zhang

I am a Chinese Canadian, with a passion for music and education. I am a CreArt board member and a community mentor. Every Saturday afternoon, I host a free guitar workshop on the CreArt website. I am also organizing the 2021 online Heart of the City Music Festival youth stage, where we host weekly performances for our local artists.

Meet Our New Music Director!

Heart of the City is pleased to be working with Mike Chenoweth. Mike has a challenging job this year due to COVID restrictions and we are keeping him on his toes.

Mike Chenoweth is an Edmonton-based veteran singer/songwriter whose roots run deep in the Edmonton and Central Alberta music scene. He’s a well-experienced performer, recording artist, music teacher, jam host, luthier, and emcee. Mike has had a number of his original songs receive airplay by CKUA, CJSR, and CBC radio stations and has written and recorded the score for the independently released movie, Happy Hour.

New Kinistinâw Park: A Community Hub

Kinistinâw Park. Adam Borman

Mary Ann Debrinski, Director, Urban Renewal, City of Edmonton, recently received this message from a community member. Kinistinâw Park runs along 96 Street between 102A and 103A Avenue.

Last Saturday my husband took our two daughters to Kinistinâw Park to play after a Farmers Market/ice cream run, while I was at work. When they arrived, an older couple had set up a speaker and were using the boardwalk to practice their two-stepping. Meanwhile, another dad and his young daughter were playing on the rubber hills. The three girls hit it off right away and the dads exchanged contact info for future play dates.

During their conversation, plans for a new Boyle Street playground came up. The other dad, who also lives close by, volunteered to help with the project. While they were talking, a couple in their 20s, who came to the park via the 96 Street bike lanes, hopped off their bicycles and were soon seen dancing alongside the older couple.

In the course of an hour or two, this space saw music, play, new friendships between neighbours, volunteer engagement, active transportation, and spontaneous, intergenerational recreation. We’re going to spend a lot of time here.

Asking “How are you?” is a Life-Saver for Family and Friends

We are all experiencing this pandemic together, and we need to help each other to get through it. For some of us, our busy lives have been reduced to staying home and hardly ever seeing another soul, except at the grocery store. I know many of us find the isolation difficult, especially seniors. So let’s make a pact to phone or send a text or e-mail people we care about. That will help all of us feel better – and it won’t cause the pandemic to get worse. We all need to hear someone ask, “How are you?” and share concerns.

All my life I’ve lived a busy life as a wife and mother and teacher. My days were filled with people. As a single parent I raised two daughters by myself, worked as many as four jobs at once besides taking care of my girls, and fixed up several old houses. Every day was filled with people – talking, listening, and sharing common concerns.

Although we may have many friends, COVID-19 has made seeing them difficult. Sometimes months go by without seeing another human being, even though I walk my dogs twice a day past houses with families of busy people inside. I know how it feels to seem to be really alone, yet living near others who are also alone. We are all in our own cocoons due to the pandemic.

What we all need is a caring neighbour, family member, or friend to call or send an e-mail and just ask, “How are you doing today?” So if you have a mom or dad, or other senior relative, or a colleague who is now retired and alone, why not call them and just ask “How are you?” Those three words show kindness, concern, and caring, and would be truly welcome.

Joanne has lived in McCauley for 15 years. She retired from full-time positions in 2006 and has since taught future teachers at the U of A about teaching art, coordinated the painting of 500 feet of murals along the Stadium LRT line, and helped with the garden contests in McCauley.

Staying Well, Safe, and Optimistic

“I think 2021 will be the year of patience. We can do it!”- Alexandra Couette Turgeon (Edmonton disability advocate)

Spring has sprung! The outdoors is calling! Like in 2020, we still have public health orders to follow, and things can change. It is always a good idea to keep updated. Our local news channels give daily updates and also www.alberta.ca/coronavirus-info-for-albertans.aspx is a good link for information.

With vaccinations rolling out, we are making progress to keep healthy. It is always very important to consult a health professional with any concerns.

Our community is strong and displays a lot of unity. Support our array of businesses. Say hello to your neighbours. Sunny days are ahead. A safe-distancing outing is good for the mind and spirit. Patience is a virtue. Stay well, stay safe, and stay optimistic.

If you are feeling uneasy many resources are available. The Canadian Mental Health Association’s distress line (edmonton.cmha.ca/programs-services/distress-line) is a great, non-judgemental support.

We have come far. At times it seems we are not moving towards a solution, but we are. We have never experienced anything like this. Let us learn from, support, and respect each other. The time will come when we will see loved ones and enjoy things we miss. We can do it together!

Ian is a columnist with the paper. He lives in the area.

Bridges Against Hate: March and Rally Against Racism, Hate, and Discrimination

Bridges Against Hate march and rally. Paula E. Kirman

Around 200 people took part in Bridges Against Hate on March 27th. The march and rally began at Wong’s Benevolent Association at 10242 96 Street. From there, participants walked to Churchill Square for a program of speakers talking of their lived experiences with racism, hate, and discrimination. Bridges Against Hate was organized by a coalition of community organizations including Asian, Black, Indigenous, Muslim, and LGBTQ2S+ representation. Similar rallies took place on the same day in Calgary and Lethbridge.

41st Annual Inner City Walk Will Be Presented in Video Format

“From Fear and Fatigue to Hope and Action: Take Up the Cross and Follow Me” is the theme of the 2021 Outdoor Way of the Cross in Edmonton. The event usually takes place in the Inner City at various locations in McCauley and Boyle Street.

Due to COVID-19 restrictions, this year’s walk will be presented virtually, in video format. The video will be available to the public at 10:00 a.m. on Good Friday (April 2) through YouTube.

“The video invites us to think about the relevance and importance of the Gospel message in our world today in relation to the theme,” says Bob McKeon, a member of the event’s organizing committee.

2021 is the 41st anniversary of the Outdoor Way of the Cross event in Edmonton. This year’s theme explores issues in the context of Luke 9:23, which speaks of journeying through pain and death to new life. In the video, local leaders contribute reflections on environmental justice, homelessness, immigration and systemic racism, Indigenous issues and more.

All people concerned about social justice are invited to view the video, no matter their faith.

Spring-Summer 2021

It’s time for issue number three of the paper for the year. As I explain in detail in my column on this same page, it is also going to be our last print issue for a while.

Our biggest challenge at the moment is keeping the paper sustainable. “Toss Us Your Toonies” is our micro-donation campaign which allows you to donate as little as $2 each month. Every little bit helps. The paper is hitting a critical point financially, and your support is needed. Head to bmcnews.org/donate for more information.

During this “down” time, we are going to continue to keep our website updated with stories from around the area by our contributors and from community organizations. Visit bmcnews.org, and sign up for our free e-newsletter which will be delivered straight to your inbox.

We will also keep posting updates to our social media users. Please follow us. Like our posts. Share our content. We post new content and photos, as well as related news from other sources. We’re bmcnews on "Facebook":https://www.facebook.com/bmcnews and "Twitter":https://www.twitter.com/bmcnews, and bmcviews on Instagram.

Thank you all for your support of the paper. Your volunteerism, financial donations, and even words of encouragement are appreciated.

The Pandemic and the Paper

The ongoing pandemic has created a lot of uncertainty for non-profit organizations that depend upon casinos as a source of funding. Boyle McCauley News is no exception.

We don’t know when we will get another casino. To be honest, we have reached a critical point. We have to make serious changes to our publishing and staffing model until we get another casino.

As a result, the paper’s Board of Directors has made the decision to suspend the print version of Boyle McCauley News until September. This will help conserve our financial resources and allow us to publish again when the third wave will (hopefully) be over.

Please consider donating to our Toss Us Your Toonies campaign at bmcnews.org/donate. No amount is too small. Your donation can be one-time or ongoing. All funds will go towards the paper’s operations.

Even then, we don’t know what the next while will look like. But you can help. Please consider donating to our Toss Us Your Toonies campaign at bmcnews.org/donate. No amount is too small. Your donation can be one-time or ongoing. All funds will go towards the paper’s operations.

We also have a (socially-distanced) fundraiser on the horizon. The details are a surprise for now, but let’s just say that it’s going to be a hair-raising experience. Details will follow online and in a future issue of the paper.

Thank you to those community members who have already stepped up, whether to help financially or to volunteer in some capacity like our contributors, proofreaders, carriers, board members, and distribution crew.

Don’t let the paper become a victim of the pandemic. If you can help, now is the time.

New Roof Shingles for New Destiny Church

New Destiny Church after the roof work was completed. Supplied

New Destiny Church (10605 96 Street) recently received a brand new set of shingles to cover the roof.

Already an overdue project, re-shingling became essential when last summer’s rains caused some damage to the interior of the building. After a concentrated effort at fundraising – including personal donations, garage sale projects, and creating a scenic wall calendar to sell from Pastor Ray Baillie’s hiking trips – New Destiny hired JPG Roofing to do the job in early March, before this year’s rains could begin again and create more problems.

New Destiny Church is one of the oldest church buildings on Church Street. Originally built in 1905 as Grace Methodist Church, it later housed a number of different congregations including St. John’s Ukrainian Orthodox Church in 1930 and Second Christian Reformed Church in 1954. Family Worship Centre moved here in 1985 and changed its name to New Destiny Church in 2016.

The high-pitched roof was a challenging job, but the crew from JPG were able to handle it. The fundraising is essentially over, the job is complete, and everyone has breathed a sigh of relief that the building is secured. Pastor Ray says the roofing project is a good metaphor of what the Church is all about: providing a shelter from the storms of life through the ministry of Jesus Christ.

For information about New Destiny’s services and programs, you can contact them at info@newdestiny.ca.

Article and photos submitted by New Destiny Church.

Vaccination Elation

Colleen Chapman after receiving her COVID-19 vaccination. Supplied

Colleen Chapman, our intrepid Volunteer Coordinator, escaped the confines of the Glenrose Hospital to get her COVID-19 vaccination on Tuesday, March 9th at Market Drugs (10203 97 Street).

Market Drugs has a fantastic set-up to administer the vaccine. Colleen reports that her appointment went smoothly. She was thrilled to gain protection – and that the injection was thankfully painless!

Market Drugs has been serving our area for around 60 years, and has been supporting Boyle McCauley News as an advertiser since we began 42 years ago. Call them at 780-422-1397 to make a vaccination appointment.

Sweet Treats and Surprises

Treats from Shan Shan Bakery. Paula E. Kirman

Shan Shan Bakery
10552 97 Street
780-974-7788

Chinatown’s Shan Shan Bakery offers a wide variety of both Chinese and western baked goods, including cakes, cookies, tarts, and buns.

I ordered a variety of treats, including a bag of egg cookies, a butter cream chocolate cake roll, two kinds of mini mooncakes (red bean and lotus paste), a fresh fruit tart, a custard egg tart, and one slice of Black Forest cake. The latter is my favourite dessert and I was incredibly curious about how Shan Shan’s version would compare.

It was surprising, to say the least. A light, fluffy chocolate cake with a mound of sweet cherry cream on top, garnished with a chocolate wafer and fruit. If you like your cake to cream/icing ratio weighted heavily in favour of the cream/icing, you will love this. It was definitely not a traditional Black Forest cake, but it was memorable (and delicious).

On the other hand, the slice of butter cream chocolate cake roll was exactly what I expected: chocolate cake rolled with a sweet and salty buttercream. The fresh fruit tart was small but delightful, with three pieces of fruit nestled in whipped cream and a dense shell. The custard egg tart was a bit bigger, with a filling that was firm and not too sweet, and a flaky crust.

I haven’t had mooncakes in ages. These were small, but densely packed with their respective fillings. The red bean paste had a satisfying, subtle sweetness, while the lotus had a nutty flavour almost reminiscent of marzipan.

The egg cookies – originally ordered as an afterthought – were amazing. The dollar-sized cookies were crispy, buttery, and a perfect accompaniment to my afternoon coffee.

You can go to Shan Shan directly, or order via Uber Eats for delivery like I did.

Fear of ‘21

1.
Fear the warm breath of others.
Vapour-borne viruses might
force you to ventilation.

2.
Fear your own breath, a weapon
that could kill your grandmother
even if you wear a mask.

3.
Fear most the half-masked strangers
who test tomatoes’ firmness:
fingerprint germs in your mouth.

4.
Host super-spreader parties.
Invite infected people.
Death’s a number on TV.

5.
In a pixel-only world
my own eyes are a wide screen,
my brain inoculated.

6.
Tree limbs waggle in the wind,
wave leafless wood through sunbeams,
observe us trapped under glass.

7.
2020 is undone.
The pandemic carries on.
At least COVID’s having fun.

Gary lives in McCauley. A note from the poet: “I’ve committed to writing at least one poem a month on the theme of ’21.’ I’ve called the project ‘Cures for Eikosienaphobia’ (which means fear of 21 in Greek). In this poem, I’ve modified the three-line haiku form into three lines of seven syllables each. I call it a 21-er. I’ve put seven of these together and made a 21-line poem out of it. This poem talks about seven different ways of dealing with the fear of ’21.”

Sebastian Barrera: “Art should be accessible and free to people.”

Sebastian Barrera. George Ellis

Sebastian Barrera is an artist and community activist living and working in the downtown core of Edmonton. Sebastian is a director with the Heart of the City Festival Society and the founder of CreArt Edmonton, an organization that utilizes the arts for social transformation.

I asked Sebastian how he got involved with Heart of the City. “At the beginning, I didn’t know what would be my role, how I would fit, how my skills fit. Little by little, I started identifying that there was overlap between the work that I was doing with Heart of the City and my work with CreArt. Then, the Youth Stage was an idea and I brought it to the table. We decided that the Youth Stage should be run and supported by Heart of the City and CreArt, but it should be run by youth.”

Sebastian said, “CreArt started a couple of years ago. When I was a new immigrant and I didn’t speak English at all, I was playing guitar everywhere. A dude from the community league said, ‘why don’t you do classes at the community hall?’ and I started doing free guitar lessons there. I saw the opportunity to grow the project to something more ambitious: a mentorship program that encourages people who have been mentored to start mentoring others. It’s the pay-it-forward concept.”

He continues, “Art should be accessible and free to people. If people want to express themselves, we need to provide the venue for people to express whatever they want to express in the way they want to express it, and provide the right spaces for people to do that. This is what CreArt is about: free programming and, of course, collaboration between different members of the community. We want to foster spaces where we can promote what artists are doing in the scene.”

CreArt Edmonton is working to produce 340 hours of programming this year. As well as hosting free music lessons every week, CreArt is working on six projects. The projects are The CreArt Round Table (a discussion of art and mentorship with local artists), Heart of the City’s Youth Stage, The Mural Project down the Kinnard Ravine (in which they will renovate 50% of the murals in the ravine), The Immigrant Artist Community Dialogue (in which they will tell the stories of several immigrant artists), and an African Film Festival which will be held late in the year 2021.

If you want to be involved with any of these projects, take lessons, or if you want to donate to CreArt, check out their website: www.creartedmonton.com

Corine Demas serves as volunteer President and Spoken Word Director of the Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton. Corine is passionate about poetry, storytelling, and her city, Edmonton. She lives in McCauley.

GLOW is a Go!

Quarter Arts Society (QAS) celebrates winter birds, brightens Boyle Street to welcome spring

Made possible through the City of Edmonton and the Heart + Soul Fund by EPCOR, the Quarters Arts Society (QAS) Annual Spring Equinox Light Sculpture Exhibit – GLOW – is a go for one night only. Centred within QAS’s new community arts space, CO*LAB (9641 102A Avenue), the outdoor exhibit opens March 20 from 7 to 11 p.m.

GLOW’s main attraction, The Winter Birds Exhibit, celebrates the brave birds that winter with us and sing Edmonton’s praises all year long. Three 15 by 7 foot inflatable chickadees will perch atop the CO*LAB building and within its community courtyard, along with lanterns and light sculptures from past exhibits accented with hypnotic light projections.

“It is very exciting that GLOW is a go, this year,” said Lorin Klask, Artistic Director and Community Organizer for QAS. “This year it is at a smaller scale and that is expected. 2021 is a transition, and we look forward to bringing back our lantern-building workshops and community lantern parade next year. We may even consider renaming the festival from GLOW to something more suited to the neighbourhood and our communities.”

The celebration includes physically-distanced, outdoor access to enjoy a fire, the exhibit, and hot beverages from On the Edge Coffee. People can also view the exhibit through CO*LAB’s warehouse windows until the end of April.

The suggested price of admission is $10 or free with a QAS membership. An annual membership is available for $20 or pay-what-you-will (no one will be turned away from obtaining a membership), and provides community members first-access to CO*LAB programs and events, AGM voting rights, discount rental rates, and more!

Space is very limited and first-come-first-entry. Limited people will be permitted access to the courtyard at a time, with a 30 minute time limit for each individual or cohort. Masks and proper social distancing practices are required by all guests, staff, and volunteers.

Further announcements are to come on musical and spoken-word acts who will perform live within CO*LAB. These performances will stream online for free or by donation.

For the most up to date information, join the event on Facebook.

Meet the MCL Board of Directors

Jordynn Vis - MCL Board President

Note: Click on one of the smaller photos to see a larger photo with the person’s name and position underneath. You can then use the arrows on either side of the photos to scroll through them, carousel style.

Jordynn Vis
MCL Board President

I’ve lived in McCauley for just over five years. We love the mature neighbourhood, and being just a quick 20 min walk from downtown is really a treat. Prior to the pandemic, we would walk on Saturday mornings to our favourite breakfast spot on Jasper Avenue. You don’t get to do that in many of Edmonton’s neighbourhoods.

I first got involved with McCauley events during the community garage sale. I realized I wanted to do more. I joined the MCL Board because I wanted to advocate for my block, and joining my community league was the first step. I’m looking forward to working closely with others in the community and to making a difference.

I am a kitchen designer and love all things kitchen stylings, home organization, and tiny space planning.

Kevin Jones
MCL Board Vice President

I moved to McCauley as a first-time homeowner in 2005, drawn to the area by the large elm trees that line the streets of 1900s-era homes.

I grew up in a small Northern Ontario town playing ball hockey, sledding at a nearby park, and beating the heat at the local pond in the summer. Everyone seemed to know each other and looked after one another. Now, 30+ years later, my two daughters (Tiffany and Danica) and I enjoy playing ball hockey in the Stadium parking lot, sledding down what’s known to neighbours as “Happy Hill,” skating at our local rink, and spending time at Giovanni Caboto Park.

I’m a member of the Boilermakers Local 146 working in the oil, gas, and power plant industry. I can often be found walking my dog Roxy, rollerblading and cycling with my kids, and trying to keep our neighbourhood clean and safe by picking up litter, blowing snow off sidewalks, or watching for suspicious activities.  

I’m proud to live in such a wonderful, diverse community where we can meet people from different generations and from all corners of the world. I look forward to meeting more neighbours and to helping the community stay connected, informed, and grow to its full potential.

Grace Kuipers
MCL Board Secretary

I’ve lived in McCauley since 1989 when I went to King’s College, which used to be kitty-corner to Lucky 97, which used to be a Safeway.

I moved to the south side for a year, but came back because I love the variety of culture and old neighbourhood feel about McCauley. I lived in the Inn Roads Housing Cooperative for a few years, and have been at the house on 109A Avenue since 2000.

I was the EMSA North soccer director for McCauley from 2006-2015, when our U14s won Provincials. I have been on the board on and off since about 2003. I have always been big on sports and programming in McCauley.

Currently, I would like to bring back the McCauley adult art class, which we ran for about seven years here. I work as a florist, and I love gardening and anything artistic.

Adam Snider
MCL Board Director

I moved to McCauley with my family in 2016. I love being within walking distance from two grocery stores and the many great restaurants in Chinatown and Little Italy. You’ll often find me stopping at the Italian Centre on my way home from work or hanging out in Giovanni Caboto Park. I joined the board to take a more active role in my community and help make McCauley an even better place to live.

David Williamson
MCL Board Director

Our family made McCauley our home 11 years ago this spring. It’s a vibrant and colourful community which makes for a wonderful space – close to recreation facilities, transit, parks, and unique businesses.

We’re grateful to have connected with neighbours and broadened our circle of friends, and we look forward to many decades of life into the future here in our wonderful community.

Alice Kos
MCL Board Director

I became a resident of McCauley 11 years ago, when I moved in with my now-husband (who also happens to be Mark Davis of REACH Edmonton/Safer McCauley). Having grown up in the community of Beverly, the overall vibe of the neighbourhood felt familiar to me and I quickly fell in love with many neighbourhood gems in Little Italy and Chinatown.

Mark and I have two kids – a 2.5 year-old girl and a 5 year-old boy – and my relationship with McCauley is one wherein I feel increasingly committed to stay. The strong sense of connectedness I feel with my neighbours and fellow community members has come to mean a lot to me.

I joined the MCL Board because I want to engage with the community on a deeper level. I’m interested in helping to strengthen community partnerships, to take action toward tangible outcomes, and to help further McCauley as the kind of community our kids love growing up in.

Reclaiming Our Back Alleys

From property crime magnets to vibrant public spaces.

Your back alley might be narrow, but its possibilities for transformation are deep and wide. This is what representatives of Edmonton’s Neighbourhood Empowerment Team (NET) suggested at a virtual information session on crime prevention held on February 16th.

NET is a crime prevention network run by the City of Edmonton, EPS, Family Centre, and the United Way of Alberta. Its February 18th session focused on back alleys behind single family homes.

“We need to transform our alleys. We need to think of alleys differently,” said Courage Fon, NET Community Liaison. “That’s where placemaking comes in.”

From glow-in-the-dark planters to back alley block parties, there are many ways to animate the often neglected spaces behind our inner city homes and garages. It’s all part of crime prevention through environmental design, workshop participants heard.

In addition to regular maintenance, such as trimming shrubbery to maintain clear sightlines, residents can experiment with ways to use alleys differently.

“Take care of your alley the same way you take care of your front yard,” Fon said.
Creative lighting, gardening, and garage door art are some of the methods that signal to would-be offenders that an alley is cared for and monitored.

Beyond beautification, the benefit of this approach encourages more foot traffic and fosters relationships between neighbours.

“We need to reclaim our back alleys as public spaces,” Fon said.

Property Safety Tips:

  • Trim hedges and shrubs along alleys for clear sightlines.
  • Report burnt out street lights by calling 311.
  • Ensure all loose items are stored indoors overnight.
  • Empty the mailbox every evening and double check all home and vehicle locks.
  • Never store spare keys in a vehicle.
  • Install high-quality locks on garage doors.
  • Use hedges or low-level fencing to indicate the boundary between public and private space.
  • Ensure all front access points are well lit and can be seen from the street.

For more information on how to keep your home, garage, and yard safe, visit edmonton.ca/net.

Joelle lives in Boyle Street.

KazMega: “My art is my well of water.”

KazMega. Lady Vanessa Cardona

KazMega is an arts educator and organizer living in downtown Edmonton. He performs poetry, composes music, emcees, and is a visual artist.

The artist has a “deep history” with Heart of the City. He is the director of Hip Hop in the Park, an organization that has worked with Heart of the City for many years. KazMega has hosted and participated with the Beat Stage since its founding. He says, “It’s one of those things where I don’t remember not doing it, so there’s definitely history.”

I asked KazMega what hip hop means to him. “Hip hop, historically in its genesis, has always been a community-based culture and has to do with interacting with members of the community through art,” he says. “A lot of people understand hip hop as a genre of music, but I understand it as a way of living. So for me, it helps govern how I operate my day-to-day life, and how I make decisions, and where my values lie, so it’s pretty important to me.”

KazMega told me a little bit about working in different mediums of art. “The visual arts, emceeing and composing, those are all art forms that I switch between. They are super important to me, how I express myself. I also think it’s how I don’t burn out. My art is my well of water. When I feel like I’m burning, it’s like I’m on fire and ready to burn out. I head to my art forms which sort of extinguishes that fire when it would have been a burnout. It’s life force to me. It means everything.”

He has been working on a project called “W.A.T.A.”

“It’s a documentation of the last four years and the pieces all kind of all fit together. They all have a theme of water. W.A.T.A spells Water. It’s almost entirely about my relationship to water, our relationship with water, and the relationship that Alberta has to water specifically,” KazMega explains.

“I learned that there are places in Alberta that have undrinkable water. I learned this four years ago. This is old news to me. This needs to be something that’s in the mainstream media now. At the time people were talking about Michigan having unclean water and undrinkable water, but not talking about Alberta having undrinkable water. The project is four years of documenting my relationship to Alberta, Alberta’s relationship to water, the world’s relationship to water, the world’s relationship to Alberta, and Edmonton’s relationship to Alberta.”

You can check out KazMega’s work, including W.A.T.A., at KazMega.com.

Corine Demas serves as volunteer President and Spoken Word Director of the Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton. Corine is passionate about poetry, storytelling, and her city, Edmonton. She lives in McCauley.

World Flavours Brought to Your Screen by the Edmonton Intercultural Centre

Ethiopian/Eritrean Cuisine that was showcased by volunteer chef Tigist Dafla in EIC’s first Cultural Fusion event on February 4th. Farai Chikowore

Most of the in-person social activities at the Edmonton Intercultural Centre (the old McCauley School) have been on hold due to COVID-19 restrictions since last spring. EIC was getting ready to start a community movie night right before the March 2020 closures but had to cancel most of its programming or move the events online in order to meet the AHS guidelines.

In February of 2021, EIC launched a new online event series called Cultural Fusion: World Flavours, to introduce Edmontonians to the many different cuisines that enrich our city. The series started on February 4th with Ethiopian/Eritrean Cuisine, also as a way to recognize and celebrate Black History Month. On February 11th, Vietnamese Cuisine was highlighted just before the Lunar New Year. In total, there will be 14 different volunteers teaching how to make dishes from 14 different cuisines.

The event is moderated by EIC Executive Director Sim Senol, so it is beyond a simple cooking class. Sim asks the volunteer chefs about their cultural traditions, common ingredients used in their cuisine, and just about anything else the participants are curious about. So far 125 people have signed up for this free event series, and over 80 people attended the 3 online events held in the first 3 weeks.

If you hadn’t heard about the series before, you can still tune in and watch the recordings of the events or sign up for the upcoming events available after the publication of this article.

More information about the Cultural Fusion: World Flavours series can be found on the EIC website at www.edmontoninterculturalcentre.ca/programs. The same page has a link for registration and will take you to further information about each cuisine.

EIC hopes to continue the series as an in-person activity once the pandemic restrictions are lifted and we can all safely gather at the cultural centre again. If you haven’t already done so you can follow @yegintrcltrlctr on Twitter or Instagram, or follow the Edmonton Edmonton Intercultural Centre page on Facebook for more information.

Article submitted by the Edmonton Intercultural Centre.

The Long Road to Healing

February 19th, 2021: Almost 10 years after her death, the Edmonton Law Courts was the scene of some measures of justice for Cindy Gladue and her family. Bradley Barton was found guilty of manslaughter. Language used to describe Cindy Gladue was respectful, not discriminatory. No body parts were brought into the courtroom. Fuller details were brought forward for the Jury to consider.

February 17th, 2021: The City of Edmonton introduced a report called “City of Edmonton Indigenous Framework.” This framework guides the City and City staff in building positive and respectful relationships with Indigenous Peoples. The Framework references the 94 Calls to Action from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and the 231 Calls to Justice from the Inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People is also a foundational piece of this Framework.

February 14th, 2020: The 30th year for the Women’s Memorial March was held in Vancouver’s Downtown Eastside. While volunteers in Edmonton have organized a Memorial March since 2006, the pandemic made that too challenging this year.

December 31st, 2020: The Alberta Avenue Community League announced steps to name a park as a memorial for missing and murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. Liz John-West, spokeswoman for the working group, said the process will take several years. The group wants to meet with Elders to discern the name for the park. The City process requires public engagement and approvals.

December 4th, 2020: Kathy King was honoured with a Stars of Alberta Award for her advocacy work on behalf of her daughter, and all missing and murdered women and girls. She is also working on the park memorial project. Her daughter Cara was last seen along 118 Avenue in 1997. Her body was recovered later from a farmer’s field. Her murder has never been solved.

December 7th, 2020: The City approved a bylaw change for ward boundaries and Indigenous Ward names. This was the final step in the political process after Indigenous Elders and community leaders approached City Council. Seventeen women on the committee of Indigenous matriarchs, iyiniw iskwewak wihtwawin, gave traditional names to the City’s naming committee. Boyle Street and McCauley is in O-day’min, an Anishinaabe word meaning strawberry or heart-berry, “the heart through which the North Saskatchewan river runs.”

If you know of recent initiatives in our community that were missed or are underway, please contact Boyle McCauley News.

Kate Quinn is the Executive Director of the Centre to End All Sexual Exploitation (CEASE).

Learning About Ward O-day’min

“There is an extraordinary collaborative spirit when you are learning and growing.” – Robbie Robertson (Canadian musician of Mohawk descent)

We are approaching a municipal election in October 2021. We will be voting for a new city councillor for our ward, and a new mayor for the City of Edmonton, as both Councillor Scott McKeen and Mayor Don Iveson have chosen not to seek re-election. I thank both of them for their service and wish them well.

Another change is the name of the ward in which we reside. Effective October 18, 2021 (election day) our ward boundaries and name will be changing. To honour the first occupants of the land upon which we reside and the sacred places in Edmonton where Indigenous Peoples have gathered for thousands of years, the wards will have Indigenous names. At the City of Edmonton website (edmonton.ca), you can find maps of the new boundaries, as well as pronunciations and information about what the names mean and how they were chosen.

Boyle Street and McCauley will now be in the ward O-day’min, (pronounced Oh-DAY-min). Here is information about the name, taken from the City of Edmonton website:

O-day’min, the strawberry, or heart berry, represents the heart of Edmonton, amiskwaciwâskahikan. The stem of the heart represents the North Saskatchewan River, the vessels are the waterways, while the veins make up the blood (people). The roots (veins) of the strawberry represent the different cultures that now make up the city.

The O-day’min is a traditional medicine that guided the Anishinaabe (people with the shared culture and language of the Algonquian tribes) understanding of the deep connection between mind, body, spirit and emotions.

I found this description very interesting, and I will be practicing pronouncing my new ward name so I can proudly say, “I reside in O-day’min.”

Ian is a columnist with the paper. He lives in the area.

Boyle Street 2021

Thank you to everyone who was able to join us for our virtual AGM on December 2nd, 2020. Thanks as well to those who joined us on January 12th, 2021 for an open conversation with Councillor Scott McKeen about the past, present, and future of Boyle Street.

We are very excited to have a new board with a huge variety of skills, gifts and abilities as well as dreams for the neighbourhood. The current BSCL Board of directors is:

  • Madeline Lawrence (President)
  • Kris Partington (Vice-President)
  • Dara Barnhardt (Secretary)
  • Karen Jackson (Treasurer)
  • Joanna Wong
  • Jonathan Lawrence
  • Aaron Barnhardt

It is an exciting time for Boyle Street and there has never been a better time to become involved. Stadium Yards and the adjacent Stadium LRT station renewal are quickly transforming the north edge of Boyle Street and we look forward to welcoming new residents, businesses, and visitors to the area.

The Board and our City partners would also like to thank all the folks who responded to the Boyle Street Renewal online survey. The upcoming City-driven renewal will focus on residential roads, replacement of street lights, sidewalks, curbs, and gutters, and examine opportunities to improve how people walk, bike, drive, and gather in Boyle Street. While we are early in the process we invite residents, business owners, and others with an interest in co-creating a vibrant Boyle Street to participate in the concept, design, and building phases.

While the board will be focused on a range of initiatives, we want to continue to encourage all residents to bring their interests and skills to the common spaces of the neighbourhood. A focus of this board will be providing partnerships and resources to those who want to get involved. One of the best tools for us to stay connected to our friends and neighbours is through the Next Door App which is easy to use and functions as a communication platform for the neighbourhood. Download the app and get connected today.

The board is thrilled to be serving you and we look forward to connecting, dreaming, and co-creating the future of Boyle Street in 2021.

Article submitted by the BSCL Board of Directors.

The Hull Block: A Restored Historic Landmark

Once condemned, the building now houses upscale apartments.

The Hull Block. David Murrary

When Bob Dawe bought the Hull Block in 1999, it had seen better days. The building, at 9664 106 Avenue, had been a major Edmonton landmark since it was constructed in 1914. But after many decades of changes in the city, Dawe says it was “a complete disaster, with a rabbit warren of small rooms on the upper floors.” The city had condemned the residential spaces, but several long-standing businesses were still operating on the main floor.

“You couldn’t believe the mess,” Dawe says. There were many broken windows, which allowed pigeons to move in. He remembers scaring the birds out with a tennis racket. There were mice too. As well, homeless people had been breaking in to spend the night.

“I like historic things,” says Dawe, Assistant Curator, Archaeology, at the Royal Alberta Museum. “Maybe I thought I was a visionary.”

Dawe hired Architect David Murray to lead his restoration and renovation project. Murray, working with HIP Architects, developed a conservation plan consisting of several phases. Murray’s goal was to keep the structure “as authentic as possible.” But, Murray says, the building had to be changed considerably to meet current building codes and standards. Also, it is extremely costly to replicate the materials and labour/craftsmanship that were used a century ago.

The first step was to restore the exterior and improve the main-floor retail spaces. The exterior retains the Late Edwardian Commercial style: red brick with numerous ornate details.

Next, the many small rooms were redesigned to create 10 condominium apartments. As originally constructed in 1914, the now upscale apartments consisted of many rooms, with every wall serving as a structural support. To create the open-plan structure that allowed a reconfiguration of the suites, Murray had to find ways to replace all the internal structural walls with a series of beams and columns.

The last phase of construction was parking lot development and roof-top amenities: a deck with a hot tub, change area, large TV, and washrooms. As well, the 40-foot flagpole, removed in 1939, was reinstated. “The flag can be seen for miles,” Dawe says.

Murray, who specializes in historic buildings, enjoyed the job. “Every building has a story,” he says, “and it is fun to explore those stories. It was a tremendous opportunity to work on this beautifully appointed structure.”

“I am happy I did it,” Dawe says. But he also mentions his disappointment with what he describes as the city’s lack of progress. On the streets around the building, there are significant drug problems and other social issues. “I had hoped for a more family-friendly environment,” he says.

Watch The Hull Block on YouTube
For more details about the history and architectural style of the building, see the YouTube video, _The Hull Block_ here.

Who Constructed the Hull Block?
The Hull Block was constructed by William Roper Hull, a Calgary businessman who built Calgary’s Grain Exchange, Alberta Block, Albion Block, and Opera House. The Hull Block has both municipal and provincial historical resource designations.

Anita Jenkins is a retired writer and editor who lives in Boyle Street.

Bingo Cards and Reflections

A year ago, life changed for all of us. Speaking for myself, the changes were sudden and unexpected. A worldwide pandemic was not on my “Things to Go Wrong in 2020” bingo card.

Yet here we are a year later, with an end seemingly both in sight and elusive. Vaccines have been developed but are taking more time than originally anticipated to reach people. Economic closings and re-openings seem more in the interest of businesses than the common good. For example, at the time I am writing this, I can go to a restaurant or work out in a gym with a trainer, but I can’t go into a library to check out a book.

To make matters even more complicated, we now have COVID variants that have taken hold in the general community. The effects remain to be seen, but some medical professionals have predicted a third wave coming soon.

In the meantime, I have friends I haven’t seen in person for almost a year, places I would like to go, and things I would like to do that are currently out of reach for reasons of safety and health restrictions. But all of my gripes seem trivial when I think of people on the front lines risking their lives to keep others safe and healthy. I am talking not only of medical professionals, but also grocery workers, delivery people, first responders, and teachers, to name only a handful of people who provide essential services.

For now, I am going to try to look forward to longer, sunnier, warmer days. I will reflect on the past year as a time of personal testing and growth. And it’s time for me to get a new bingo card.

A Tour for the Taste Buds

Sweet, spicy, and sour at Cui Hua Gui Lin Noodle House.

Chicken Lo Noodle. Paula E. Kirman

Cui Hua Gui Lin Noodle House is a Chinatown restaurant specializing in – as its name suggests – noodle dishes. The menu consists of a variety of soups (which include noodles), vermicelli dishes, and house specialty noodles. The proteins in most of the dishes include beef, pork, and chicken, as well as lamb in a few of them.

Gui Lin refers to a style of cuisine that is a mixture of Cantonese and Hunanese. It utilizes sweetness and spices, especially chili. It is also a city in China known for its rice noodles.

Since Gui Lin specializes in noodles, I ordered house noodle dishes for delivery: a Chicken Lo Noodle and a Brisket Lo Noodle, to be precise. The noodles were flat and almost clear, with a slightly chewy texture. They mixed in well with the protein, peanuts, bamboo shoots, and parsley that adorned each bowl.

Each mouthful resonated with notes of sweet, spicy, and sour in different levels of intensity. The flavours were balanced, and as someone who has a low spice tolerance threshold, I was not overwhelmed with heat, but felt my taste buds tingling just enough. While the chicken mostly tasted from the hot and sour flavour soundtrack, the brisket was tender and maintained some of its meaty notes, although it also had the same flavour combination underscoring it. The person who ate the rest of the Brisket Lo Noodle raved about the dish’s flavour.

I also ordered one of the restaurant’s appetizers, the lemongrass chicken. What looked like the equivalent of two thighs were cut up in bite-sized pieces and cooked in the tangy and mildly spicy lemongrass, served with a sweet and sour dipping sauce. Definitely flavourful and satisfying.

Overall, after finishing my lunch I felt like I had taken a culinary journey, which I hope to explore again.

Most dishes are in the $15-$19 range. If you’re nearby, take-out is your best option. Delivery is also available via Uber Eats.

Volunteer with the Heart of the City Festival in 2021

Heart of the City wants you to be involved in our special celebrations this year! Our mission is “inspiration and opportunity through the arts.” Here are two volunteer opportunities with HOTC 2021.

HOTC Digital Ambassadors Team
As a digital ambassador, you will help to amplify our mandate and events on social media platforms through liking and sharing posts. This could take anywhere from half an hour a week to a few hours a week, depending on your role. We are also looking for a captain for this team! Our captain will help write and post Heart of the City content throughout the year on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, and Tik Tok! We welcome teens to join this team!

HOTC Fashionista Team
We are seeking local fashionistas of all ages to submit two photographs to us. One of the fashionista in a casual look and one in a dressed up look! We’d love to have some families submit together! We will showcase these pictures on our website. Then we will be hosting a “Fashion from the Heart of the City” Zoom party, where our fashionistas can share their fashion and talk about their inspiration! We especially want to hear from fashion designers and makeup artists!

Email us at heartcityfest.com for more information or to register for these and other teams.

Corine Demas serves as volunteer President and Spoken Word Director of the Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton.

April 2021

Welcome to our April issue! Despite the cover date indicating that it is almost spring, we’re actually working on this issue during February’s polar vortex. Hopefully by the time you read this, the temperatures will be above zero.

We are still looking for Block Carriers (in McCauley) and Apartment Ambassadors/Condo Connectors (in Boyle Street) to help us get the paper to readers. It’s a great way to volunteer and connect with your community. Contact me for more information at editor@bmcnews.org.

Here is another reminder that you can find our current issue, archives, and exclusive stories at our website
(bmcnews.org), especially about news that happens between print issues.

If you use social media and you’re not already following us, you should. We post new content and photos, as well as related news from other sources. Follow us bmcnews on "Facebook":https://www.facebook.com/bmcnews and "Twitter":https://www.twitter.com/bmcnews, and bmcviews on Instagram.

Finally, help keep the paper sustainable by donating to “Toss Us Your Toonies.” This is our micro-donation campaign which allows you to donate as little as $2 each month. Head to bmcnews.org/donate for more information.

A Family Tribute at the McCauley Rink

The Mannarino/Pagnotta Family. Dan Glugosh

Since 2013, every year on January 17th the Mannarino and Pagnotta family pay a memorial tribute to Albert Pagnotta. Albert, one of the builders of the original McCauley Community Rink, grew up and lived in McCauley for all of his 47 years. Albert was the chef at our community’s Santa Maria Goretti Centre, and was most generous in feeding and employing our homeless citizens.

This year, his family gathered to put together care packages that included masks, toques, gloves, and socks. These were delivered to me (Dan Glugosh) at our community rink for distribution. Also, a large cash donation was given to the rink, for repairs and upgrades. Those in our community who help people here make the Boyle Street/McCauley area special.

Dan Glugosh lives in McCauley and coordinates the McCauley Rink.

Volunteer with the Heart of the City Festival in 2021

Heart of the City wants you to be involved in our special celebrations this year! Our mission is “inspiration and opportunity through the arts.” Here are two volunteer opportunities with HOTC 2021.

HOTC Digital Ambassadors Team
As a digital ambassador, you will help to amplify our mandate and events on social media platforms through liking and sharing posts. This could take anywhere from half an hour a week to a few hours a week, depending on your role. We are also looking for a captain for this team! Our captain will help write and post Heart of the City content throughout the year on Instagram, Twitter, Facebook, Youtube, and Tik Tok! We welcome teens to join this team!

HOTC Fashionista Team
We are seeking local fashionistas of all ages to submit two photographs to us. One of the fashionista in a casual look and one in a dressed up look! We’d love to have some families submit together! We will showcase these pictures on our website. Then we will be hosting a “Fashion from the Heart of the City” Zoom party, where our fashionistas can share their fashion and talk about their inspiration! We especially want to hear from fashion designers and makeup artists!

Email us at heartcityfest.com for more information or to register for these and other teams.

Corine Demas serves as volunteer President and Spoken Word Director of the Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton She lives in McCauley.

Virtual Lunar New Year Celebrations

Hung Mon Athletic Club presenting a Lion Dance.

Lunar New Year celebrations for the Year of the Ox streamed online on February 6th and 7th. The virtual event was organized by the Edmonton Chinese Bilingual Education Association and the Chinese Graduates Association of Alberta, with sponsorship from Kingsway Mall. These screen captures feature performances of a lion dance from the Hung Mon Athletic Club and music from the Edmonton Chinese Philharmonica Association. Over $8,000 was raised during the weekend, with proceeds going to the Edmonton Chinatown Care Centre and the Edmonton Chinese Seniors Lodge. Both facilities have been heavily affected by COVID-19 outbreaks

Heart of the City AGM Report

Heart of the City Festival Society would like to fill you in on our Annual General Meeting in January and what happened with HOTC in 2020.

We had quite a year in 2020. The whole world was shaken up! Edmonton is known as “Festival City.” But 2020 was hard on all of us who plan and organize the festivals that make this city so vibrant and welcoming. Heart of the City decided to pull up our sleeves and pivot. We held an online festival in 2020. We hosted youth live streams run by the students of CreArt Edmonton. We hosted music live streams with Donna Durand and HOTC veteran Rebbeca Lappa! We also hosted free writing workshops with Kaz Mega, Lady Vanessa Cardona, Kat Clarke, and Zach Dafoe.

At our AGM on January 17th, we elected a new board and voted in our executive team. New to the board this year are: Brad Boyd, Mike Chenoweth, K’alii Luuyaltkw, and Stef Andrews. Returning to the board are Mike Siek, Corine Demas (me), Elizabeth McEwan, Val Squires, Sebastian Barrera, Fay Goble, and Derek Dallorto.

For our 2021 executive, we have me (Corine Demas) as President, Val Squires as Vice President, Mike Siek as Secretary, and Derek Dallorto as our Treasurer.

We are excited to share some news with you, our neighbours. We will be working with the Sarah McLachlan School of Music to offer mentorships for emerging musicians and sound techs! We are also going to be providing free admissions to writing workshops with Lady Vanessa Cardona and a professional development workshop on editing with Edmonton’s Poet Laureate Nisha Patel. There are so many things cooking in the HOTC kitchen, some we can’t yet reveal. Keep an eye open, as we will let you know about our fun plans to celebrate the arts and music of downtown Edmonton in 2021 in future editions of the paper!

Corine Demas serves as volunteer President and Spoken Word Director of the Heart of the City Festival Society of Edmonton.

Where to Find Boyle McCauley News

Boyle McCauley News is delivered by our volunteer Block Carriers (in McCauley) and Apartment Ambassadors/Condo Connectors (in Boyle Street) to approximately 2500 homes in the area.

If you do not receive the paper at your home, there are numerous places where you can pick up a copy.

Newspaper Box Locations:

  • 10844 95 Street (near Sorrentino’s)
  • 95 Street & Jasper Avenue (North by the CIDEX Hat at Five Corners)
  • 86 Street & Jasper Avenue (by Riverside Towers)
  • 90 Street & Jasper Avenue (bus stop by Highlands building)
  • Boyle Street Plaza (by main entrance)
  • 97 Street & 103 Avenue (near Farmers Market)
  • 97 Street & 107 Avenue (near Lucky 97)

Businesses
We also drop off copies at a number businesses in and around the area, including:

  • Lucky 97 (10725 97 Street)
  • Italian Centre (10878 95 Street)
  • Zocalo (10826 95 Street)

This list is usually longer, but a number of places we normally drop papers off at are closed due to COVID-19. We will update this list as things change.

If you have a business in (or near) the area and would like papers dropped off, contact us at editor@bmcnews.org.

Would you like to volunteer to help deliver the paper to your block or building? Contact editor@bmcnews.org for more information.

A Family Tradition at the McCauley Rink

A generous donation to the McCauley Rink is made in honour of the memory of an incredible community member.

The Pagnotta/Mannarino Family Dan Glugosh

Since 2013, every year on January 17th the Mannarino and Pagnotta family pay a memorial tribute to Albert Pagnotta. Albert, one of the builders of the original McCauley Community Rink, grew up and lived in McCauley for all of his 47 years. Albert was the chef at our community’s Santa Maria Goretti Centre, and was most generous in feeding and employing our homeless citizens.

This year, his family gathered to put together care packages that included masks, toques, gloves, and socks. These were delivered to me (Dan Glugosh) at our community rink for distribution. Also, a large cash donation was given to the rink, for repairs and upgrades. Those in our community who help people here make the Boyle Street/McCauley area special.

Dan Glugosh lives in McCauley and coordinates the McCauley Rink.

McCauley AGM Review

Our Annual General Meeting was on December 13th, 2020. We had the pleasure of having Chris and Jennie from the Edmonton Federation of Community Leagues to facilitate the meeting. The meeting was virtual and done via Zoom and was accessible by phone for those without video conferencing capabilities. We had some minor technical difficulties, but everyone did great as we navigated our way through it.

We had the pleasure of hearing the President’s Report written by out-going President Greg Lane, which was read by the current President Jordynn Vis (me). Then, we had some discussions based on our current situation as a board during these pandemic seasons. Much of this is a focus on administrative tasks and implementing procedures and protocols within the League itself to maintain and improve communication between the League and the community. In the end, after this scheduled administrative focus, we hope to have financial reports, grants, funds, and plans more readily accessible for the community. The financial report was delayed from being reported at the AGM due to minor complications. The League and the community voted on a full audit of all financial histories of the League from previous years. The League aims to have this financial report ready for March of 2021, when the next AGM is tentatively scheduled (specific date TBD).

We ended the meeting with the much anticipated discussion on the rink and pending opening dates. The League experienced some legal red tape that we had to get through before the official opening of the rink, hence the very delayed opening of the rink this season. Since much of what the League normally does throughout the year cannot be currently done due to the pandemic (in-person larger gatherings, events, etc.), part of our focus will be to put protocols and procedures for the rink in place so future winter seasons should not have the same delays as this year.

Motions were made to relieve past board members of their signatory duties and signing authorities and pass those onto the new board members. A new board slate was voted in.

The new Executive board members are:
Jordynn Vis, President
Kevin Jones, Vice President
Meagan Auer, Secretary
Linn Cardinal, Treasurer

The board Members-at-Large are: Grace Kuipers, Adam Snider, Alice Kos, and David Williamson. To request a copy of the AGM minutes, please private message the McCauley Community League Facebook page @McCauleyCommunityLeague.

Jordynn Vis is the President of the McCauley Community League.

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